Quantcast

7 Quotes and Tweets You Can't Miss From Senate's All-Nighter on Climate Change

Climate

The U.S. senators who participated in the all-night session on climate change didn't get much sleep, but they may have made progress for a country that is seemingly still divided on the issue.

The event, which began Monday around 6:30 p.m., lasted 14 hours and 26 minutes, according to the Sierra Club. It featured about 30 senators who spoke at varying lengths about how the nation should address the issue.

U.S. Sen. Cory Booker, D-NJ, speaks during the Senate's all-night session on climate change. Screenshot: C-SPAN

None of the senators proposed legislation, but they were pleased to divert attention away from climate deniers. Groups that have long advocated for the recognition of climate change were pleased, too, hoping that the event will lead to serious, legislative work on the matter.

“The Environmental Protection Agency is currently working on common sense safeguards under current law to keep carbon pollution in check. However, last week, the House of Representatives voted against the steps that the Environmental Protection Agency is taking to cut carbon pollution," Earthjustice Senior Legislative Representative Sarah Saylor said.

“We are glad to see the Senate is poised to reject that backward-looking approach and instead work toward meeting our shared obligation to future generations to cut carbon pollution and protect our planet."

Here's a collection of tweets from the legislators themselves and a couple advocates for addressing climate change: 

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid

“Climate Change is real. It’s here. It’s time to stop acting like those who ignore this crisis. For example, the oil baron Koch brothers and their allies in Congress have a valid point of view. They don’t.” 

Sen. Brian Schatz, D-HI

"We have a simple message for all Americans: We're not going to rest until Congress acts on the most pressing issue of our time," said Sen. Brian Schatz, a freshman Democrat from Hawaii, who organized the all-nighter on the Senate floor.

Sen. Bill Nelson, D-FL (session's final speaker)

"We are in severe jeopardy. It is time for us to get out of our lethargy and recognize the problem that is happening in front of our very eyes."

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A Starbucks barista prepares a drink at a Starbucks Coffee Shop location in New York. Ramin Talaie / Corbis via Getty Images

By Cathy Cassata

Are you getting your fill of Starbucks' new Almondmilk Honey Flat White, Oatmilk Honey Latte, and Coconutmilk Latte, but wondering just how healthy they are?

Read More
Radiation warning sign at the Union Carbide uranium mill in Rifle, Colorado, in 1972. Credit: National Archives / Environmental Protection Agency, public domain

By Sharon Kelly

Back in April last year, the Trump administration's Environmental Protection Agency decided it was "not necessary" to update the rules for toxic waste from oil and gas wells. Torrents of wastewater flow daily from the nation's 1.5 million active oil and gas wells and the agency's own research has warned it may pose risks to the country's drinking water supplies.

Read More
Sponsored
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg takes part in a "Friday for Future" youth demonstration in a street of Davos on Jan. 24, 2020 on the sideline of the World Economic Forum annual meeting. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP via Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin pretended not to know who Greta Thunberg is, and then he told her to get a degree in economics before giving world leaders advice, as The Guardian reported.

Read More
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired this image of forest fire smoke hovering over North America on Aug. 15, 2018. NASA Earth Observatory

New York City isn't known for having the cleanest air, but researchers traced recent air pollution spikes there to two surprising sources — fires hundreds of miles away in Canada and the southeastern U.S.

Read More
If temperatures continue to rise, the world is at risk from global sea-level rise, which will flood many coastal cities as seen above in Bangladesh. NurPhoto / Contributor / Getty Images

The mounting climate emergency may spur the next global financial crisis and the world's central banks are woefully ill equipped to handle the consequences, according to a new book-length report by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), as S&P Global reported. Located in Basel, Switzerland, the BIS is an umbrella organization for the world's central banks.

Read More