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​7 Instagram Accounts Every Nature Lover Should Be Following​

It's hard to believe Instagram is only five years old since now it is ubiquitous. By December 2010, Instagram had 1 million registered users. By September of 2011, it was up to 10 million. As of December of last year, Instagram co-founder Kevin Systrom announced that Instagram has 300 million users accessing the site per month. That is some crazy growth. And of course that many users means an insane amount of uploaded photos.

So, choosing who to follow can be an overwhelming task. If you're like me, you love beautiful shots of nature and should follow these seven Instagram accounts:

1. U.S. Department of the Interior is home to the National Park Service, this department posts some insanely beautiful photos on the daily. Seriously, it was so hard to pick just one to feature.

2. National Geographic is, of course, renowned for its stunning images, and its Instagram account is definitely one to follow.  

3. Conservation International: I could easily scroll through this organization's pictures for hours. Who cares what Kim Kardashian is up to? Look at this!

People need resources and services from the #ocean. But are we using them in a way that can continue into the future?

A photo posted by Conservation International (@conservationorg) on

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4. National Marine Fisheries Service: This is the work of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and they've got some awesome shots of our friends in the sea.  

NOAA’s newest research ship, the Reuben Lasker, departed San Diego last week on its first scientific mission that includes surveying gray whales along the West Coast. The survey will also search the Gulf of Alaska for right whales, among the most rare and endangered whales on Earth. The population of gray whales in the eastern Pacific Ocean is estimated at about 20,000, but biologists want to know how many of those summer south of the Aleutian Islands and whether they are genetically distinct from whales that summer farther north in the Bering and Chukchi seas. Learn more about the Reuben Lasker here: http://www.afsc.noaa.gov/News/newest_noaa_ship.htm #whales #Pacific #ocean #biology #research #ReubenLasker #NOAAFisheries #NOAA Credit: Wayne Perryman/SWFSC/NOAA A photo posted by NOAA Fisheries (@noaafisheries) on

5. Oceana: Whales and dolphins playing together. Does it get any better? I challenge you to scroll through their page and not have your heart instantly warmed.

6. The Nature Conservancy: This conservation organization has some truly breathtaking photos like this one taken in Costa Rica.  

The scene at Campanario Point and Cano Island Biological Preserve in Costa Rica—by Sergio Pucci. A photo posted by The Nature Conservancy (@nature_org) on

7. National Parks Foundation: If this organization's photos don't make you want to go visit America's beautiful parks and natural areas, then I don't know what will. Maybe you should listen to Bill Nye and Michelle Obama tell you why you need to "find your park" for some extra motivation.

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