Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

65 Percent of Americans Say EVs Essential to Future, Just 1 Percent Drive Them

Business
65 Percent of Americans Say EVs Essential to Future, Just 1 Percent Drive Them

Though fewer than 1 percent of the U.S. population drives an electric vehicle (EV) or plug-in hybrid, four out of ever 10 households could begin doing so with little or no change to their driving habits and vehicle needs.

That data comes from the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) and Consumers Union, which issued a report Wednesday based on its polling of 1,004 people earlier this fall. Basic needs for an EV or plug-in hybrid are parking and a plug, which 56 percent of the respondents said they have.

“Drivers may have preconceptions about whether electric vehicles can meet their driving needs and habits, and this survey shows that for many, they can,” said Josh Goldman, policy analyst for the UCS Clean Vehicles Program.  

Graphic credit: Union of Concerned Scientists and the Consumers Union

One misconception about EVs, the survey found, was the idea that people would need to cut down on driving to preserve their charges. Sixty-nine percent of U.S. drivers travel less than 60 miles per weekday, which is well within the range of most battery-powered cars on the market.

Graphic credit: Union of Concerned Scientists and Consumers Union

The survey found that 65 percent of Americans think EVs are an essential part of the country's transportation future for reducing oil use and global warming pollution. Sixty percent saying they would consider owning one themselves.

Graphic credit: Union of Concerned Scientists and Consumers Union

Eight governors recently announced a joint plan to put 3.3 million zero-emission vehicles on America’s roads by 2025.

“There is a huge potential to continue expanding the market for electric vehicles, a key solution for tackling climate change and cutting our nation’s projected oil use in half over the next 20 years,” said David Reichmuth, senior engineer for the UCS Clean Vehicles Program.

“Americans recognize that we need to reduce our oil use, and electric vehicles offer a great opportunity for drivers to do just that.”

Graphic credit: Union of Concerned Scientists and Consumers Union

Visit EcoWatch’s TRANSPORTATION page for more related news on this topic.

  

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Atlantic puffins courting at Maine Coastal Island National Wildlife Refuge in 2009. USFWS / Flickr

When Europeans first arrived in North America, Atlantic puffins were common on islands in the Gulf of Maine. But hunters killed many of the birds for food or for feathers to adorn ladies' hats. By the 1800s, the population in Maine had plummeted.

Read More Show Less
Rescue workers dig through the rubble following a gas explosion in Baltimore, Maryland on Aug. 10, 2020. J. Countess / Getty Images

A "major" natural gas explosion killed two people and seriously injured at least seven in Baltimore, Maryland Monday morning.

Read More Show Less
The recalled list includes red, yellow, white and sweet yellow onions, which may be tainted with salmonella. Pxhere

Nearly 900 people across the U.S. and Canada have been sickened by salmonella linked to onions distributed by Thomson International, the The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Methane flares at a fracking site near a home in Colorado on Oct. 25, 2014. WildEarth Guardians / Flickr

In the coming days, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is expected to use its power to roll back yet another Obama-era environmental protection meant to curb air pollution and slow the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Researchers on the ICESCAPE mission, funded by NASA, examine melt ponds and their surrounding ice in 2011 to see how changing conditions in the Arctic affect the biological and chemical makeup of the ocean. NASA / Flickr

By Alex Kirby

The temperature of the Arctic matters to the entire world: it helps to keep the global climate fairly cool. Scientists now say that by 2035 there could be an end to Arctic sea ice.

Read More Show Less
President Vladimir Putin is seen enjoying the Opening Ceremony of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Pascal Le Segretain / Getty Images

Russia's Health Ministry has given regulatory approval for the world's first COVID-19 vaccine after less than two months of human testing, President Vladimir Putin said on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A John Deere agricultural tractor sits under a collapsed building following a derecho storm on Aug. 10, 2020 near Franklin Grove, Illinois. Daniel Acker / Getty Images

A powerful series of thunderstorms roared across the Midwest on Monday, downing trees, damaging structures and knocking out power to more than a million people.

Read More Show Less