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6 Stunning Images Show Sense of Urgency to Act on Climate

Climate
6 Stunning Images Show Sense of Urgency to Act on Climate

By Clara Chaisson

Scientists are notorious for struggling to communicate the importance of their work in compelling ways. But as both a researcher and an artist, Jill Pelto is in a unique position to reach a broad audience. While double majoring in earth science and studio art at the University of Maine, she honed her “environmental art," which combines stunning imagery of the natural world with actual data points measuring the effects of climate change.

Northern Cascade glaciers losing mass. Image credit: Jill Pelto

This mashup of painted scenes and statistics amplifies the impact of endangered species, raging wildfires and melting glaciers. Drawn by Pelto's practiced hand, these images immediately connect the data to their source and the trend lines lend the imagery a sense of urgency. Check out some of Pelto's pieces here:

Clownfish and the decline in ocean pH. Image credit: Jill Pelto

Forest fire activity increasing with global temperature rise. Image credit: Jill Pelto

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Arctic foxes and the decreasing area of sea ice. Image credit: Jill Pelto

Coho salmon in decline. Image credit: Jill Pelto

Endangered tiger and rainforest habitat decline. Image credit: Jill Pelto

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