Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

6 Striking Aerial Images Show How Deforestation Has Altered the Earth

6 Striking Aerial Images Show How Deforestation Has Altered the Earth

There's no debating that humans have greatly scarred the Earth. And, there's no better way to see the extent of that damage than via aerial images. Below are six NASA satellite images that show massive deforestation in many parts of the world.

According to NASA, the state of Rondônia in western Brazil—once home to 208,000 square kilometers of forest (about 51.4 million acres), an area slightly smaller than the state of Kansas—has become one of the most deforested parts of the Amazon. In the past three decades, clearing and degradation of the state’s forests have been rapid: 4,200 square kilometers cleared by 1978; 30,000 by 1988; and 53,300 by 1998. By 2003, an estimated 67,764 square kilometers of rainforest—an area larger than the state of West Virginia—had been cleared.

The state of Rondônia in western Brazil. Left from 1975 and right from 2012. Photo credit: NASA

You can also watch this animation of images from 1975 until 2012, acquired by NASA's Landsat 5 and 7 satellites, showing enormous tracts of Amazonian forest disappearing in Rondônia, Brazil.

This NASA satellite image from Aug. 28, 2013 shows deforestation that has occurred in Peru near Tamshiyacu.

Photo credit: NASA

This NASA satellite image from 1988 shows widespread deforestation in Mexico compared to its neighbor Guatemala.

Photo credit: NASA

This NASA satellite image shows Haiti (left) and the Dominican Republic (right).

Photo credit: NASA

This image, taken in April 2001 from the International Space Station, shows scars from deforestation in Bolivia where the stripped land is used for agriculture. Each of the pinwheel stripped areas are centered around a small community.

Photo credit: NASA

These satellite images show before and after deforestation due to gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon.

Photo credit: NASA

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

How Palm Oil, Fruit Bats and Deforestation Could Be Linked to Ebola Epidemic

2 Americans Make History Free-Climbing Yosemite’s El Capitan

Stunning Photos Show Similarities Between Humans and Other Animals

Could mouthwash help stop the spread of the new coronavirus? Craig F. Walker / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Could mouthwash help stop the spread of the new coronavirus?

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

This turtle dove is part of Operation Turtle Dove; the European Commission estimates there may be fewer than 5,000 pairs left in the UK. Ian / Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Naomi Larsson

For centuries, the delicate silver dove has been a symbol of love and fidelity.

Read More Show Less

Trending

We pet owners know how much you love your pooch. It's your best friend. It gives you pure happiness and comfort when you're together. But there are times that dogs can be very challenging, especially if they are suffering from a certain ailment. As a dog owner, all you want to do is ease whatever pain or discomfort your best friend is feeling.

Read More Show Less
Swimming alongside an animatronic dolphin, a person learns about hydrodynamics. Edge Innovations

Life-sized, ultra-realistic robotic dolphins could help end animal captivity by replacing living creatures in aquariums and theme parks.

Read More Show Less
A Stop the Money Pipeline protester holds a banner outside JP Morgan headquarters in NYC on Feb. 25, 2020; JP Morgan is a top contributor to the fossil fuel industry. Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Green groups applauded Sen. Jeff Merkley on Wednesday for introducing a pioneering pair of bills that aim to "protect the long-term health and well-being of the American people and their economy from the catastrophic effects of climate chaos" by preventing banks and international financial institutions from financing fossil fuels.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch