Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

6 Power Foods that Help Fight Cancer

Food

Cancer rates are expected to rise 70 percent over the next 20 years according to World Health Organization despite tremendous advances in medical technology and knowledge. On Jan. 13, President Barack Obama announced a national initiative to find a cure for cancer.

Should we wait for the medical system to find a cure or can we act for ourselves now?

Let’s start with eating healthy real food, especially ones that have been proven scientifically to help in fighting cancer. Photo credit: Harvest to Table

Let’s start with eating healthy real food, especially ones that have been proven scientifically to help in fighting cancer. Here are six of them.

1. Flaxseed Lignans Help Fight Cancer

  • Reduce prostate cancer with flaxseeds. Research studies have shown that lignans can slow the growth of prostate cancer cells.

  • Breast cancer survival was significant in three studies that followed thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer, published at PubMed Central123. They found, “Lignans might play an important role in reducing all-cause and cancer-specific mortality of the patients operated on for breast cancer.”

2. Tomatoes Lower Risk of Cancer

  • Risk of breast cancer may be reduced with tomatoes due to their high amounts of carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and total carotenoids) as shown by research in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  • Risk of prostate cancer was found to be reduced in a study showing men who ate more than 10 portions of tomatoes or tomato products per week reduced their risk of prostate cancer by 18 percent compared to men who ate less than 10.

  • It is clear that the current evidence favors the consumption of tomatoes and tomato products rather than lycopene supplements as stated in the Oxford Journals.

3. Avocados Help Fight Cancer Cells

  • The glutathione found in avocados has been found to help prevent some kinds of cancers. Researchers at Ohio State University found nutrients in Hass avocados kill or stop the growth of pre-cancerous cells that lead to oral cancer.

  • Molecules in avocados have been found to attack leukemia stem cells directly while leaving healthy cells unharmed, according to a study.

4. Garlic Fights Cancer

  • Lung cancer risk decreased in a study with those who ate raw garlic two or more times a week, according to a study published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research. The researchers also found that even smokers who ate raw garlic decreased their risk of lung cancer by around 30 percent.

  • Garlic, as an allium vegetable, has been found in a study to protect against stomach and colon cancers.

  • “In test tubes, garlic seems to kill cancer cells. And studies suggest that people who eat more raw or cooked garlic are less likely to get colon and stomach cancers and cancer of the esophagus.” —University of Maryland Medical Center.

5. Legumes (Beans and Lentils) Reduce Cancer Risk

  • Prostate cancer risk was found to be lower in a six-year study of more than 14,000 men living in the U.S. Those with the highest intake of legumes (beans, lentils or split peas) had a significantly lower risk of prostate cancer.

  • Legumes were found to reduce risk for colon cancer. Scientists examined 14 studies with 1,903,459 participants and found that those consuming the most legumes, especially soybeans, had the lowest risk for colon cancer.

  • Pancreatic cancer risk was lessened when legumes were consumed more than two times a week compared to those who ate legumes rarely or less than once a week, according to a study.

6. Cruciferous Vegetables (Broccoli, Cabbage, Brussels Sprouts) Help Prevent Cancer

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

11 Foods to Avoid If You Want to Lose Weight

Why You Should Have a Himalayan Salt Lamp in Your Home

4 Things You Should Know About Caffeine in Your Coffee

High Sugar Consumption Linked to Breast Cancer

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda

The enduring pandemic will make conventional forms of travel difficult if not impossible this summer. As a result, many will consider virtual alternatives for their vacations, including one of the oldest forms of virtual reality – books.

Read More Show Less
Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility on Thursday accused NOAA of ignoring its own scientists' findings about the endangerment of the North Atlantic right whale. Lauren Packard / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Julia Conley

As the North Atlantic right whale was placed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's list of critically endangered species Thursday, environmental protection groups accusing the U.S. government of bowing to fishing and fossil fuel industry pressure to downplay the threat and failing to enact common-sense restrictions to protect the animals.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Beth Ann Mayer

Since even moderate-intensity workouts offer a slew of benefits, walking is a good choice for people looking to stay healthy.

Read More Show Less
Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday. JustTulsa / CC BY 2.0

Much of Eastern Oklahoma, including most of Tulsa, remains an Indian reservation, the Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

Read More Show Less
The Firefly Watch project is among the options for aspiring citizen scientists to join. Mike Lewinski / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

By Tiffany Means

Summer and fall are great seasons to enjoy the outdoors. But if you're already spending extra time outside because of the COVID-19 pandemic, you may be out of ideas on how to make fresh-air activities feel special. Here are a few suggestions to keep both adults and children entertained and educated in the months ahead, many of which can be done from the comfort of one's home or backyard.

Read More Show Less
People sit at the bar of a restaurant in Austin, Texas, on June 26, 2020. Texas Governor Greg Abbott ordered bars to be closed by noon on June 26 and for restaurants to be reduced to 50% occupancy. Coronavirus cases in Texas spiked after being one of the first states to begin reopening. SERGIO FLORES / AFP via Getty Images

The coronavirus may linger in the air in crowded indoor spaces, spreading from one person to the next, the World Health Organization acknowledged on Thursday, as The New York Times reported. The announcement came just days after 239 scientists wrote a letter urging the WHO to consider that the novel coronavirus is lingering in indoor spaces and infecting people, as EcoWatch reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A never-before-documented frog species has been discovered in the Peruvian highlands and named Phrynopus remotum. Germán Chávez

By Angela Nicoletti

The eastern slopes of the Andes Mountains in central Perú are among the most remote places in the world.

Read More Show Less