Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

6 Power Foods that Help Fight Cancer

Food

Cancer rates are expected to rise 70 percent over the next 20 years according to World Health Organization despite tremendous advances in medical technology and knowledge. On Jan. 13, President Barack Obama announced a national initiative to find a cure for cancer.

Should we wait for the medical system to find a cure or can we act for ourselves now?

Let’s start with eating healthy real food, especially ones that have been proven scientifically to help in fighting cancer. Photo credit: Harvest to Table

Let’s start with eating healthy real food, especially ones that have been proven scientifically to help in fighting cancer. Here are six of them.

1. Flaxseed Lignans Help Fight Cancer

  • Reduce prostate cancer with flaxseeds. Research studies have shown that lignans can slow the growth of prostate cancer cells.

  • Breast cancer survival was significant in three studies that followed thousands of women diagnosed with breast cancer, published at PubMed Central123. They found, “Lignans might play an important role in reducing all-cause and cancer-specific mortality of the patients operated on for breast cancer.”

2. Tomatoes Lower Risk of Cancer

  • Risk of breast cancer may be reduced with tomatoes due to their high amounts of carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin, lycopene and total carotenoids) as shown by research in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  • Risk of prostate cancer was found to be reduced in a study showing men who ate more than 10 portions of tomatoes or tomato products per week reduced their risk of prostate cancer by 18 percent compared to men who ate less than 10.

  • It is clear that the current evidence favors the consumption of tomatoes and tomato products rather than lycopene supplements as stated in the Oxford Journals.

3. Avocados Help Fight Cancer Cells

  • The glutathione found in avocados has been found to help prevent some kinds of cancers. Researchers at Ohio State University found nutrients in Hass avocados kill or stop the growth of pre-cancerous cells that lead to oral cancer.

  • Molecules in avocados have been found to attack leukemia stem cells directly while leaving healthy cells unharmed, according to a study.

4. Garlic Fights Cancer

  • Lung cancer risk decreased in a study with those who ate raw garlic two or more times a week, according to a study published in the journal Cancer Prevention Research. The researchers also found that even smokers who ate raw garlic decreased their risk of lung cancer by around 30 percent.

  • Garlic, as an allium vegetable, has been found in a study to protect against stomach and colon cancers.

  • “In test tubes, garlic seems to kill cancer cells. And studies suggest that people who eat more raw or cooked garlic are less likely to get colon and stomach cancers and cancer of the esophagus.” —University of Maryland Medical Center.

5. Legumes (Beans and Lentils) Reduce Cancer Risk

  • Prostate cancer risk was found to be lower in a six-year study of more than 14,000 men living in the U.S. Those with the highest intake of legumes (beans, lentils or split peas) had a significantly lower risk of prostate cancer.

  • Legumes were found to reduce risk for colon cancer. Scientists examined 14 studies with 1,903,459 participants and found that those consuming the most legumes, especially soybeans, had the lowest risk for colon cancer.

  • Pancreatic cancer risk was lessened when legumes were consumed more than two times a week compared to those who ate legumes rarely or less than once a week, according to a study.

6. Cruciferous Vegetables (Broccoli, Cabbage, Brussels Sprouts) Help Prevent Cancer

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

11 Foods to Avoid If You Want to Lose Weight

Why You Should Have a Himalayan Salt Lamp in Your Home

4 Things You Should Know About Caffeine in Your Coffee

High Sugar Consumption Linked to Breast Cancer

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Charli Shield

At unsettling times like the coronavirus outbreak, it might feel like things are very much out of your control. Most routines have been thrown into disarray and the future, as far as the experts tell us, is far from certain.

Read More Show Less
Pie Ranch in San Mateo, California, is a highly diverse farm that has both organic and food justice certification. Katie Greaney

By Elizabeth Henderson

Farmworkers, farmers and their organizations around the country have been singing the same tune for years on the urgent need for immigration reform. That harmony turns to discord as soon as you get down to details on how to get it done, what to include and what compromises you are willing to make. Case in point: the Farm Workforce Modernization Act (H.R. 5038), which passed in the House of Representatives on Dec. 11, 2019, by a vote of 260-165. The Senate received the bill the next day and referred it to the Committee on the Judiciary, where it remains. Two hundred and fifty agriculture and labor groups signed on to the United Farm Workers' (UFW) call for support for H.R. 5038. UFW President Arturo Rodriguez rejoiced:

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A woman walks to her train in Grand Central Terminal as New York City attempts to slow down the spread of coronavirus through social distancing on March 27. John Lamparski / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

A council representing more than 800,000 doctors across the U.S. signed a letter Friday imploring President Donald Trump to reverse his call for businesses to reopen by April 12, warning that the president's flouting of the guidance of public health experts could jeopardize the health of millions of Americans and throw hospitals into even more chaos as they fight the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less