Quantcast

6 of Donald Trump's Most Outrageous Tweets on Climate Change

Popular

Donald Trump is yet again claiming that global warming isn't occurring because, well, because it's "really cold" in New York City today.

Forget that not only is this year going to go down as the hottest year on record globally, but it will, in the words of Joe Romm at Think Progress, “crush 2014,” which holds the current record. Donald Trump has repeatedly denied what 97 percent of the global scientific community agrees on: the climate is changing and humans are to blame.

To this day, Trump believes global warming is a "hoax," something only nine percent of Republicans believe (even conservative Republicans), according to a recent survey conducted by three prominent Republican pollsters.

Here's just a sampling of The Donald's tweets on the subject:

In reality, fall as we know it is "disappearing," according to the folks at Discovery News. Climate change is wreaking havoc on many of the quintessential aspects of autumn: fall colors, cool weather and pumpkins. That's right. Just as Starbucks announced its beloved Pumpkin Spice Latte will actually contain real pumpkin, climate change is putting a real damper on America's pumpkin crop.

Watch this video to find out why:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

4 Ways to Determine if Your Nutritional Supplement Is Healthy for You

Larry David as Bernie Sanders on Saturday Night Live: ‘We Need a Revolution’

Bill McKibben Gets Arrested Exposing Exxon’s ‘Unparalleled Evil’

Obama Cancels Arctic Drilling Leases

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Jared Kaufman

Eating a better diet has been linked with lower levels of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. But unfortunately 821 million people — about 1 in 9 worldwide — face hunger, and roughly 2 billion people worldwide are overweight or obese, according to the U.N. World Health Organization. In addition, food insecurity is associated with even higher health care costs in the U.S., particularly among older people. To help direct worldwide focus toward solving these issues, the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals call for the elimination of hunger, food insecurity and undernutrition by 2030.

Read More Show Less
Healthline

Made from the freshly sprouted leaves of Triticum aestivum, wheatgrass is known for its nutrient-dense and powerful antioxidant properties.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less

mevans / E+ / Getty Images

The federal agency that manages the Great Barrier Reef issued an unprecedented statement that broke ranks with Australia's conservative government and called for urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less

A powerful earthquake struck near Athens, Greece and shook the capital city for 15 seconds on Friday, causing people to run into the streets to escape the threat of falling buildings, NBC News reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
U.S. government scientists concluded in a new report that last month was the hottest June on record. Angelo Juan Ramos / Flickr

By Jessica Corbett

As meteorologists warned Thursday that temperatures above 100°F are expected to impact two-thirds of the country this weekend, U.S. government scientists revealed that last month was the hottest June ever recorded — bolstering calls for radical global action on the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less
Rod Waddington / CC BY-SA 2.0

By John R. Platt

For years now conservationists have warned that many of Madagascar's iconic lemur species face the risk of extinction due to rampant deforestation, the illegal pet trade and the emerging market for the primates' meat.

Yes, people eat lemurs, and the reasons they do aren't exactly what we might expect.

Read More Show Less
Pixnio

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Many types of flour are commonly available on the shelves of your local supermarket.

Read More Show Less