Quantcast

6 Must-See Videos From Lima Climate Talks

EcoWatch is featuring live broadcasting via Democracy Now! from Dec. 8 - Dec. 12, 8 to 9 a.m., from the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru. Diplomats from around the world are gathered in Lima to reach a draft agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming, which will be finalized in 2015.

Here are the segments from Tuesday, Dec. 9:

"They Have Destroyed Our Livelihood": Activists Protest Shell and Chevron at U.N. Climate Talks

At the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru, protesters gathered inside Monday to protest the invitation of oil giants Shell and Chevron to speak on summit panels. Democracy Now! producer Mike Burke was there when scores of summit delegates attempted to walk into an event featuring Shell climate change adviser David Hone.

"Corporate Conquistadors": New Report Exposes How Multinationals Drive, Profit From Climate Change

As we broadcast from the United Nations Climate Summit in Lima, Peru, we speak with Pascoe Sabido of the Corporate Europe Observatory, which just released a new report titled "Corporate Conquistadors: The Many Ways Multinationals Both Drive and Profit From Climate Destruction." "This is COP 20. For 20 years we’ve been going without progressing to a fair and progressive climate deal that we need,” Sabido says. "One of the big reasons is the aggressive lobbying of the fossil fuel industry both at the national level and here at the talks." The new report is a joint project with Democracy Center and the Transnational Institute.

Peru Climate Summit is the 1st in an Amazon Nation Amidst Growing Threat to "Heart of the Planet"

This year's U.N. Climate Change Conference in Peru marks the first time the talks have been held in an Amazon country. More than 70 percent of Peru's national territory is within the Amazon Basin. The founder and executive director of Amazon Watch, Atossa Soltani, joins us to talk about the significance of the U.N. climate summit taking place in Peru amidst long-term threats to the Amazon. Soltani also addresses the challenges facing developing countries with lucrative, but carbon-intensive energy resources, and whether the United States is being a responsible environmental steward for future generations. "When we lose the Amazon, we not only create emissions, but we lose the climate stabilizing function of the forest," Soltani says. "We're reaching a tipping point."

Indigenous Women on the Front Lines of Defending the Earth Share Their Solutions to Climate Change

Today is “Gender Day” at the U.N. Climate Change Conference, a day that acknowledges the disproportionate impact of climate change on women, who make up 70 percent of the world's poor. We hear from a panel of indigenous women from around the world who met off-site Monday to share their solutions to climate change. The event, hosted by the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, featured indigenous women leaders on the front lines of defending the Earth from exploitation by fossil fuel companies. Speakers included Patricia Gualinga, a Kichwa leader from Sarayaku, Ecuador, and her niece, Nina Gualinga. In 2012, the Sarayaku won a case against the Ecuadorean government after a foreign oil company was permitted to encroach on their land.

Democracy Now! Interviews Pablo Solon of Focus on the Global South

As we broadcast from the U.N. Climate Conference in Lima, Peru, where delegates from around the world are meeting on a global agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming, the first text of this year's draft has been released. We are joined by Pablo Solón, Bolivia's former ambassador to the United Nations and former chief negotiator on climate change. Now the executive director of Focus on the Global South, Solón was a presenter of the International Rights of Nature Tribunal, which also took place in Peru.

Climate Justice Activists From Around the World Show Solidarity with Philippines

Among the many protests at the United Nations Climate Change Conference was a solidarity action with the Philippines, which was hit by Typhoon Hagupit over the weekend. Some 900,000 people were forced to evacuate. We speak with participants from Chile, Africa and New Zealand, who all say the negotiators at COP 20 are taking positions that fail to reflect the urgency that is needed to address climate change for countries that are already being impacted.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Banks Fear Risk of Investment in Fossil Fuels

Cities Around the World Take Lead on Tackling Climate Change

Fracking Linked to Miscarriages, Birth Defects and Infertility

Sponsored
Three scissor-tailed flycatcher fledglings in a mesquite tree in Texas. Texas Eagle / CC BY-NC 2.0

By Gary Paul Nabhan

President Trump has declared a national emergency to fund a wall along our nation's southern border. The border wall issue has bitterly divided people across the U.S., becoming a vivid symbol of political deadlock.

Read More Show Less
PeopleImages / E+ / Getty Images

By Daniel Ross

Hurricane Florence, which battered the U.S. East Coast last September, left a trail of ruin and destruction estimated to cost between $17 billion and $22 billion. Some of the damage was all too visible—smashed homes and livelihoods. But other damage was less so, like the long-term environmental impacts in North Carolina from hog waste that spilled out over large open-air lagoons saturated in the rains.

Hog waste can contain potentially dangerous pathogens, pharmaceuticals and chemicals. According to the state's Department of Environmental Quality, as of early October nearly 100 such lagoons were damaged, breached or were very close to being so, the effluent from which can seep into waterways and drinking water supplies.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
This picture taken on May 21, 2018 shows discarded climbing equipment and rubbish scattered around Camp 4 of Mount Everest. Decades of commercial mountaineering have turned Mount Everest into the world's highest rubbish dump as an increasing number of big-spending climbers pay little attention to the ugly footprint they leave behind. DOMA SHERPA / AFP / Getty Images

China has closed its Everest base camp to tourists because of a buildup of trash on the world's tallest mountain.

Read More Show Less
Berezko / iStock / Getty Images

The last thing on your mind in February is gardening. But this is prime time to prepare for a very important task: planting fruit trees.

Read More Show Less
Researchers tested the eggs of Arctic northern fulmers like these in Nunavut, Canada. Fiona Paton / Flickr

By Madison Dapcevich

Plastics have been recorded in every corner of the world, from the remote icy waters of Antarctica to the bellies of deep-sea fishes. Now, preliminary findings presented at this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Washington, DC suggest that bird eggs from the high Arctic—one of the most remote wildernesses on the planet—show evidence of contamination from chemicals used in plastics.

Read More Show Less