Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

$6 Million Up for Grabs to Strengthen California's EV Infrastructure

Business
$6 Million Up for Grabs to Strengthen California's EV Infrastructure

With the most zero-emissions vehicles on the road and the country's first electric school bus, California's new competitive grant program will significantly augment its electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure.

A big part of that is making even more charging stations available. The California Energy Commission (CEC) began soliciting for a $6 million grant program this month that will fund the construction of charging stations across the state. Applicants have until Jan. 28 to file proposals.

A charging station at the offices of the South Coast Air Management District. Photo credit: California Energy Commission

California, which already has nearly 1,500 charging stations, is offering the grant funds in four categories. About two-thirds of the $6 million available will support a single site or combination of destination, corridor or workplace charging. Destinations include attractions or shopping centers, while corridor charging would be ideal for long drives along the state's coast.

"Examples [of corridor charging] include charging locations that would allow drivers of electric vehicles to more rapidly travel between San Diego and the Los Angeles area, the Los Angeles area and the San Francisco Bay Area, the San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento, Sacramento and Fresno, etc.," according to the CEC.

Table credit: California Energy Commission

The grant funding originates from California's Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology (ARFVT) program, which was made possible by the 2007 passing of Assembly Bill 118. According to the CEC, the ARFVT program has an annual budget of about $100 million. The funding is meant to:

  • Reduce California’s use and dependence on petroleum transportation fuels and increase the use of alternative and renewable fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. 
  • Produce sustainable alternative and renewable low-carbon fuels in California.
  • Expand alternative fueling infrastructure and fueling stations.
  • Improve the efficiency, performance and market viability of alternative light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicle technologies.
  • Retrofit medium- and heavy-duty on-road and non-road vehicle fleets to alternative technologies or fuel use.
  • Expand the alternative fueling infrastructure available to existing fleets, public transit and transportation corridors.
  • Establish workforce training programs and conduct public outreach on the benefits of alternative transportation fuels and vehicle technologies.

Visit EcoWatch’s TRANSPORTATION page for more related news on this topic.

David Attenborough narrates "The Year Earth Changed," premiering globally April 16 on Apple TV+. Apple

Next week marks the second Earth Day of the coronavirus pandemic. While a year of lockdowns and travel restrictions has limited our ability to explore the natural world and gather with others for its defense, it is still possible to experience the wonder and inspiration from the safety of your home.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Michael Svoboda

For April's bookshelf we take a cue from Earth Day and step back to look at the bigger picture. It wasn't climate change that motivated people to attend the teach-ins and protests that marked that first observance in 1970; it was pollution, the destruction of wild lands and habitats, and the consequent deaths of species.

Read More Show Less
Trending
An Amazon.com Inc. worker walks past a row of vans outside a distribution facility on Feb. 2, 2021 in Hawthorne, California. PATRICK T. FALLON / AFP via Getty Images

Over the past year, Amazon has significantly expanded its warehouses in Southern California, employing residents in communities that have suffered from high unemployment rates, The Guardian reports. But a new report shows the negative environmental impacts of the boom, highlighting its impact on low-income communities of color across Southern California.

Read More Show Less
Xiulin Ruan, a Purdue University professor of mechanical engineering, holds up his lab's sample of the whitest paint on record. Purdue University / Jared Pike

Scientists at the University of Purdue have developed the whitest and coolest paint on record.

Read More Show Less

Less than three years after California governor Jerry Brown said the state would launch "our own damn satellite" to track pollution in the face of the Trump administration's climate denial, California, NASA, and a constellation of private companies, nonprofits, and foundations are teaming up to do just that.

Read More Show Less