Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

6 House Plants That Can Dramatically Improve Your Health

Health + Wellness
6 House Plants That Can Dramatically Improve Your Health

As the seasons change and winter rolls in, we spend significantly less time outdoors, which means we’re significantly more likely to experience poor air quality. Although we may not realize it as we go about our daily lives, indoor toxins can have a drastic impact on our health, potentially leading to Asthma, allergies, inflammation and even cancer. Thankfully, there are natural ways to bring the benefits of the outdoors inside, in a cost effective way. Try these amazing house plants for improved indoor health.

1. Jasmine: Helps Promote Sleep Quality

Photo credit: DavidWolfe.com

Jasmine is a genus of shrubs and vines in the olive family that is commonly found outdoors, but can live indoors as well. It emits scents that have shown to make for better sleep, as well as increase your levels of alertness.

2. Lavender: Reduce Anxiety and Stress

Photo credit: DavidWolfe.com

Lavender is a genus of 39 known species of flowering plants in the mint family and a commonly used essential oil. It not only smells wonderful, but can also reduce anxiety and stress, slow heart rate, improve your sleep and calm restless babies.

3. Rosemary: Improve Your Memory

Photo credit: DavidWolfe.com

Rosemary is also a member of the mint family. A perennial herb, native to the mediterranean region. It has been proven to be effective at increasing your memory as well as the overall air quality in the room.

4. Aloe Vera: Improve Overall Air Quality

Photo credit: Andreas Issleib

Aloe Vera is a succulent plant species that has been commonly used in herbal medicine since the beginning of the first century AD. NASA utilizes these plants for their superior ability to increase the overall quality of air with fresh oxygen.

5. English Ivy Plant: Reduce Mold Count

Photo credit: DavidWolfe.com

English Ivy is a species of flowering plant native to Europe and Western Asia. This plant has been proven to reduce airborne mold by 94 percent, which can have a significant benefit for those who suffer from allergies or lung irritation.

6. Snake Plant: Prevent Headaches

Photo credit: Desire Van Meulder

Snake Plant is a species of flowering plant in the family Asparagaceae native to West Africa. It’s been proven to be extremely effective with treating headaches, eye irritation and respiratory problems. It can also help to increase your overall energy levels.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Solar Powered ‘Farm from a Box’: Everything You Need to Run an Off-Grid Farm

Couple Builds Greenhouse Around Home to Grow Food and Keep Warm

10 Easy Vegan Superfood Recipes

How to Make Non-Toxic Zero-Waste Deodorant

Lakota spiritual leader Chief Arvol Looking Horse attends a demonstration against the proposed Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico in front of the White House in Washington, DC, on January 28, 2015. Nicholas Kamm / AFP / Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is planning to cancel the controversial Keystone XL pipeline on the first day of his administration, a document reported by CBC on Sunday suggests.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A plume of smoke from wildfires burning in the Angeles National Forest is seen from downtown Los Angeles on Aug. 29, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

California is bracing for rare January wildfires this week amid damaging Santa Ana winds coupled with unusually hot and dry winter weather.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A new study invites parents of cancer patients to answer questions about their environment. FatCamera / Getty Images

By Jennifer Sass, Nsedu Obot Witherspoon, Dr. Philip J. Landrigan and Simon Strong

"Prevention is the cure for child/teen cancer." This is the welcoming statement on a website called 'TheReasonsWhy.Us', where families affected by childhood cancers can sign up for a landmark new study into the potential environmental causes.

Read More Show Less
Madagascar has been experiencing ongoing droughts and food insecurity since 2016. arturbo / Getty Images

Nearly 1.6 million people in the southern part of Madagascar have faced food insecurity since 2016, experiencing one drought after another, the United Nations World Food Program reported.

Read More Show Less
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst stand at the Orion spacecraft during a visit at the training unit of the Columbus space laboratory at the European Astronaut training centre of the European Space Agency ESA in Cologne, Germany on May 18, 2016. Ina Fassbender / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Monir Ghaedi

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to keep most of Europe on pause, the EU aims for a breakthrough in its space program. The continent is seeking more than just a self-sufficient space industry competitive with China and the U.S.; the industry must also fit into the European Green Deal.

Read More Show Less