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6 Exceptional Environmentalists Presented With Brower Youth Award

Who’s responsible for some of North America’s most creative environmental projects, such as diverting 110 tons of reusable items from landfills, mobilizing communities and campaigning for green economies? Young activists who have yet to reach their 23rd birthdays.

This month, the six winners of the 2013 Brower Youth Awards will meet in San Francisco, CA, for a week of exciting activities, culminating in an awards ceremony on Oct. 22 at the Nourse Theatre. The awards ceremony, run by Earth Island Institute, is free and open to the public with more than 900 attendees present each year. The 2013 Brower Youth Award winners include:

  • Alex Freid, 22, of New Hampshire, for reinventing waste diversion on college campuses through his non-profit organization The Post-Landfill Action Network (PLAN).
  • Amira Odeh, 22, of Puerto Rico, for initiating the first student sustainability movement focused on water consumption and plastics pollution on her university’s campus.
  • Arielle Klagsbrun, 22, of Missouri, for mobilizing the St. Louis community to fight for a healthy and equitable future free of big coal corporations.
  • Cassandra Lin, 15, of Rhode Island, for addressing community needs with unconventional biofuel generation from used cooking oil.
  • Chloe Maxmin, 21, of Maine, for developing a common network for young environmentalists to propel their projects forward.
  • Jonathan Ferrer, 18, of New York, for encouraging youth involvement in climate resiliency and community projects in New York City.

The 2013 winners were selected from a competitive applicant pool and review process. These six winners distinguished themselves with their creative and effective work tackling problems ranging from community organization, renewable energy and climate education. The panel of seven judges includes innovative leaders such as David Suzuki of the David Suzuki Foundation, the standard-bearer author of the environmental justice field Robert Bullard and Rue Mapp, the founder of Outdoor Afro, an organization that connects African American youth with the outdoors.

Over the past fourteen years, 85 current and past Brower Youth Award recipients have raised more than $2 million for environmental causes, trained more than 3,000 youth in advocacy, involved more than 50,000 people in green projects, implemented 20 university-wide environmental policies, passed eight pieces of legislation, organized more than 4,000 events and actions, produced nearly three dozen documentary films and held more than 500 lobbying meetings with elected officials.

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