Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

6 Common Kitchen Items That Are Great for Your Skin

Health + Wellness
6 Common Kitchen Items That Are Great for Your Skin

Skin care products have to be one of the most confusing and overwhelming things in the personal care section. Companies market "systems" with different (and expensive!) creams for day and night, for cleaning and toning and moisturizing and firming. You can spend hundreds on different products for different times of day, different seasons and different parts of your body. And you can do a lot of wondering  about whether these products are truly as "natural" as they often proclaim.

Or you can go in your kitchen and pluck something off the shelf or from the fridge that you know doesn't have any chemicals or additives and does just as good a job of making your skin look dewy and glowing as that $50-a-half-ounce product from the store. Most of them have multiple uses too.

You don't need a half dozen different moisturizers if you have olive oil in your kitchen cabinet.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

1. Olive oil. Like a lot of these edible beauty products, olive oil is versatile, working its magic on a lot of areas. It can substitute for expensive "cuticle oil," making  your hands soft and smooth. It's a makeup remover that doubles as a moisturizer. It's especially good on those dry, scaly areas like elbows, knees and feet, and it softens the delicate skin around your eyes just as well as any high-priced "eye cream." Plus you can use it as an all-purpose, leave-on moisturizer, rubbed into your skin on your legs, hands, neck and face.

2. Honey. If you need a little extra moisturizing punch in areas so dry they're cracking, rub on a thin layer of honey and let it sink in for a while before you wipe off the gooey extra. It's a little sticky but it's especially great for the ravages of winter—chapped lips and cracked feet. It's also got nutrients and antioxidants that feed your skin and make it look ravishingly healthy. And it blends well with fruits and vegetables like avocado to make a face mask.

3. Avocado. No time or money to go to the spa? Make a face mask in your kitchen with avocado. Mash it up and blend it with one of the other products listed here—honey or olive oil, or try egg whites. Its oil penetrates the skin deeply, bringing with it the vitamins and antioxidants the fruit contains. Many swear it reduces the appearance of aging as well as skin irritations like acne, rashes, eczema and sunburn.

Avocados can reduces the appearance of aging as well as skin irritations.
Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

4. Oatmeal. Eat it for breakfast because it's good for you and then use it on your face as a scrub to gently remove dead skin. It's one of a number of products on your kitchen shelf that can act as an exfoliant—sugar, ground nuts and coffee are three more—but it's one of the best because of its hydrating qualities. You'll want to mix those others with some type of oil to soften their harshness.

5. Cucumbers. You've probably heard this before—and it's true. If you've had too many late nights and too little sleep, and it's starting to show in the dark circles and puffiness around your eyes, place a slice of cucumber on each eye and lay back to let it tighten that slack skin. Its ascorbic acid will draw out the excessive moisture that causes your eyes to look swollen as it nourishes your skin. It can also be used to take some of the sting out of a sunburn.

Pricy eye pads from the cosmetics counter? These will do the job just as well.
Photo credit: Shutterstock

6. Lemon juice. Need a skin toner? Don't buy a fancy product with fragrance and possibly even drying alcohol. Just dab on some lemon juice for 10 or 15 minutes and rinse. It will not only tighten your skin but subtly lighten blemishes, scars, freckles and other discolored spots. Its antibacterial and astringent properties can help stave off breakouts.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

3 Herbal Recipes for Beautiful Hair

10 Simple Ways to Skip Toxic Skin Care

22 Cosmetics Companies File for ‘Trade Secret’ Status to Skirt Toxins Law

A group of climate activists that have been cycling from the North of the country in stages to draw attention to the climate case are arriving to the Court of Justice on the day that the climate lawsuit against Shell starts in The Hague, on December 1st, 2020. Romy Arroyo Fernandez / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

Representing more than 17,000 claimants who support climate action, the international organization Friends of the Earth on Tuesday opened its case against fossil fuel giant Shell at The Hague by demanding that a judge order the corporation to significantly reduce its carbon emissions in the next decade.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Eat Just, Inc. announced that its cultured chicken has been approved for sale in Singapore as an ingredient in chicken bites. The company has developed other cultured chicken formats as well. Eat Just

As concern mounts over the environmental impacts of animal agriculture, Singapore has issued the world's first regulatory approval for lab-grown meat.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wildfires are seen burning out of control on November 30, 2020 on Fraser Island, Australia. Queensland Fire and Emergency Services / Getty Images

The world's largest sand island has been on fire for the past six weeks due to a campfire, and Australia's firefighters have yet to prevent flames from destroying the fragile ecosystem.

Read More Show Less
A plane sprays pesticide over the Wynwood neighborhood in the hope of controlling and reducing the number of mosquitos, some of which may be capable of spreading the Zika virus on Aug. 6, 2016 in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A national nonprofit revealed Tuesday that testing commissioned by the group as well as separate analysis conducted by Massachusetts officials show samples of an aerially sprayed pesticide used by the commonwealth and at least 25 other states to control mosquito-borne illnesses contain toxic substances that critics call "forever chemicals."

Read More Show Less
Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern plants a tree as part of Trees That Count, a project to help New Zealand make a positive impact on climate change, on June 30, 2019 in Wellington, New Zealand. Hagen Hopkins / Getty Images

The government of New Zealand declared a climate emergency on Wednesday, a symbolic step recognizing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predictions of substantial global warming if emissions do not fall.

Read More Show Less