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5 Reasons to Love Eating Eggs

Food
5 Reasons to Love Eating Eggs

What is there to love about eggs? What's not to love about them!

Eggs can be used in so many different ways, incorporated into any course and any meal. Photo credit: Shutterstock

1. Eggs are super-nutritious. They contain lots of easily absorbed protein as well as iron, phosphorus, riboflavin and zinc. They've got vitamins including A, B6, B12, E, K and D, which isn't found in a lot of foods. Eggs are a great source of choline: one whole eggs can provide almost 30 percent of your daily requirement. It helps keep the nervous system running smoothly and has been found to reduce women's risk of breast cancer. Egg yolks are also high in lutein and zeaxanthin, which help prevent macular degeneration.

2. Don't believe that stuff about how egg yolks are cholesterol poison. Eggs do contain a lot of cholesterol but eating eggs in moderation—no more than one or two a day so don't go crazy—won't have an impact on your cholesterol level. For most healthy people, it doesn't impact the risk of heart disease or strike. And it raises what's come to be known as "the good cholesterol."

3. While the color of the egg makes no difference nutritionally, what the chickens are fed does. Organic eggs come from chickens whose feed contains no GMOs, pesticides or animal byproducts. If the carton says "omega-3 enhanced, that's good. It means the chicken feed was fortified with flaxseed or canola oil.

4. Eggs can be used in so many different ways, incorporated into any course and any meal. Almost everyone grew up having eggs for breakfast, whether scrambled, fried or toasted in an omelet. They can be used in salads, soups, stir frys, casseroles, sandwiches and cocktails. And of course they are essential for a whole range of desserts including custards, cream puffs, cookies, brownies and cakes. They're a staple in the food of almost every culture.

5. Eating eggs on their own—not, unfortunately, in a brownie and a cream puff—can even help you lose weight! Eggs can make you feel fuller and eat less for up to a day and a half. Protein-heavy foods like eggs have been found to reduce the urge to nibble.

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