Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

5 Reasons Ted Cruz Is More Dangerous Than Donald Trump

Climate
5 Reasons Ted Cruz Is More Dangerous Than Donald Trump

Five reasons Ted Cruz is even more dangerous than Donald Trump:

1. He's more fanatical. Trump is a bully and bigot but doesn't hew to any sharp ideological line. Cruz is a fierce ideologue: He denies the existence of man-made climate change, rejects same-sex marriage, wants to abolish the Internal Revenue Service, believes the 2nd amendment guarantees everyone a right to guns, doesn't believe in a constitutional divide between church and state, favors the death penalty, opposes international agreements, embraces a confrontational foreign policy, rejects immigration reform, demands the repeal of “every blessed word of Obamacare" and takes a strict “originalist" view of the meaning of the Constitution.

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

2. Cruz is a true believer. Trump has no firm principles except making money, getting attention and gaining power. But Cruz really does detest the federal government and has spent much of his life embracing radical right economic and political views. When Cruz said “we are facing what I consider to be the epic battle of our generation," he wasn't referring to jihadist terrorism but to Obamacare.

3. He's Smarter. Trump is no slouch but he hasn't given any indication of a sharp mind. Cruz is razer-sharp: It's not just his degrees from Princeton and Harvard Law, along with an impressive record at Harvard or even his winning arguments before the Supreme Court. For his entire adult life he's been a fierce debater with a intensely-logical debater's mind.

4. He's more disciplined and strategic. Trump is all over the place, often winging it, saying whatever pops into his mind. Cruz hews to a clear script and a carefully crafted strategy. He plays the long game (as he's shown in Iowa). Cruz's legal career entailed a sustained use of the courts to achieve conservative ends and he plots his moves carefully.

5. Cruz is a loner who's willing to destroy institutions. Trump has spent his career using the federal government and making friends with big shots. Not Cruz. Most of his Republican colleagues in the Senate detest him. And Cruz is eager to destroy: He has repeatedly crossed to the other side of the Capitol and led House Republicans toward fiscal cliffs. In the Fall of 2013, Cruz's strident opposition to Obamacare—including a 21-hour talking marathon—led in a significant way to the shutdown of the federal government.

Both men would be disasters for America, but Cruz would be the larger disaster.

What do you think? Comment below.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Snow-Deprived Ski Industry Wants to Know What Ted Cruz Plans to Do About Climate Change

A deadly tornado touched down near the city of Fultondale, Alabama on Jan. 25, 2021. Justin1569 / Wikipedia Commons / CC BY-SA 3.0

A tornado tore through a city north of Birmingham, Alabama, Monday night, killing one person and injuring at least 30.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An empty school bus by a field of chemical plants in "Cancer Alley," one of the most polluted areas of the U.S. that stretches from New Orleans to Baton Rouge, where oil refineries and petrochemical plants reside alongside suburban homes. Giles Clarke / Getty Images

By David Konisky

On his first day in office President Joe Biden started signing executive orders to reverse Trump administration policies. One sweeping directive calls for stronger action to protect public health and the environment and hold polluters accountable, including those who "disproportionately harm communities of color and low-income communities."

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pixabay

By Katherine Kornei

Clear-cutting a forest is relatively easy—just pick a tree and start chopping. But there are benefits to more sophisticated forest management. One technique—which involves repeatedly harvesting smaller trees every 30 or so years but leaving an upper story of larger trees for longer periods (60, 90, or 120 years)—ensures a steady supply of both firewood and construction timber.

Read More Show Less
Icebergs near Ilulissat, Greenland on Oct. 13, 2020. Climate change is having a profound effect with glaciers and the Greenland ice cap retreating. Ulrik Pedersen / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Earth's ice is melting 57 percent faster than in the 1990s and the world has lost more than 28 trillion tons of ice since 1994, research published Monday in The Cryosphere shows.

Read More Show Less
Caribbean islands such as Trinidad have plenty of water for swimming, but locals face water shortages for basic needs. Marc Guitard / Getty Images

By Jewel Fraser

Noreen Nunez lives in a middle-class neighborhood that rises up a hillside in Trinidad's Tunapuna-Piarco region.

Read More Show Less