Quantcast

5 Powerful Voices Talk Climate Action

Climate

At its root, the formula for a great dinner party is pretty simple: find a bunch of people with unique and interesting perspectives, bring them together, ask a few questions and get them talking. You don’t know what exactly will happen—and that’s part of the fun.

We took the same approach with a Twitter chat we held a few weeks ago, inviting a group of some pretty impressive (if we do say so ourselves) activists and media professionals with distinct points of view on the state of climate action today to join us and get talking.

So Who Was at the Table?

  • Sam Champion, America’s most-watched weather anchor and managing editor at The Weather Channel.
  • Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, youth director of Earth Guardians and all-around climate hero (he gave an incredible and powerful speech at the UN General Assembly earlier this year, in case you missed it).
  • Vanessa Hauc, an Emmy Award-winning journalist for the Telemundo Network and co-founder of Sachamama, an organization committed to educating and empowering the Latino community on the importance of preserving the planet.
  • Harriet Shugarman, Climate Reality Leader and executive director of Climate Mama, an organization focused on educating and engaging families in the movement for climate solutions.
  • Sergio Carlo, actor, radio host, and soon-to-be Climate Reality Leader (he’ll be joining us in Miami for our training taking place Sept. 28-30).

So What Did They Talk About?

When you get five strong voices like these together, you can easily cover a lot of ground. We’re headed to Florida to train new Climate Reality Leaders this month. And in Florida, state employees were allegedly told not to say the words “climate change” in public. Of course, we’re going to be training these new leaders how to effectively say “climate change” in public online, in the media, and pretty much everywhere else.

With that in mind, we wanted to get these five talking about what they know best—strategies for getting loud about climate change, even when it’s considered rebellious or difficult. We know that facing climate change can sometimes feel overwhelming, but the good news is that there are a lot of really smart people facing it together and sometimes you just have to take the first step. And with that, it was time to get on to the questions.

First, we wanted to know: Can one person make a difference in combatting climate change?

Read page 1

Why do you think people deny climate change, especially in places at higher risk like Florida?

Are there some communities that are impacted more by climate change than others?

At #CrinFlorida (The upcoming Climate Reality training in Miami, Florida), one of our themes is Latinos raising their voices on climate change—which is exciting. Why is climate change an important issue for Latinos?

Read page 1

What are they top three things people can do to help solve climate change?

The news can be gloomy sometimes. What keeps you going as you work on climate?

A lot of progress has been made this year. What give you #ClimateHope for the future?

And with that, we had to wrap it up. Even the greatest dinner parties and conversations have to come to a close eventually. But talking with thoughtful and committed activists like our five guests and watching the creative ways they’re working for climate solutions—from bringing climate consciousness to hip-hop to speaking on the issue through the media to addressing world leaders at the UN to reaching out to families—gives us a whole lot of #ClimateHope and we’re hungry to come back for seconds.

If there was one thing to take away from the chat, it’s the simple message that one person can do so much. Anyone can take climate action today and if you’re ready to make a real difference, join us as a Climate Reality Leader at an upcoming training.

Visit the Climate Reality Leadership Corps page to stay updated on future trainings. With a global deal to limit greenhouse gas emissions on the table at the UN’s climate conference in Paris this year, it's more important than ever that we build strong public support so world leaders know: we want a clean, healthy, and prosperous future—and getting there starts with stopping climate change.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Koch Brothers: Apocalyptical Forces of Ignorance and Greed, Says RFK Jr.

It’s Official: Summer 2015 Hottest Ever in Recorded History

11 Congressional Republicans Call for Climate Action Ahead of Pope Francis’ Visit

‘America Is Not a Planet’: The Only Accurate Thing Said About Climate Change at GOP Debate

Show Comments ()

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

PhotoAlto / Laurence Mouton / Getty Images

By Ana Reisdorf, MS, RD

You've probably heard the buzz around collagen supplements and your skin by now. But is the hype really that promising? After all, research has pointed to both the benefits and downsides of collagen supplements — and for many beauty-conscious folk, collagen isn't vegan.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Marlene Cimons

Neil Pederson's introduction to tree rings came from a "sweet and kindly" college instructor, who nevertheless was "one of the most boring professors I'd ever experienced," Pederson said. "I swore tree rings off then and there." But they kept coming back to haunt him.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Aerial view of the explosion site of a chemical factory on March 22 in Yancheng, Jiangsu Province of China. Caixin Media / VCG / Getty Images)

At least 47 people have died in an explosion at a plant in Yancheng, China Thursday run by a chemical company with a history of environmental violations, Sky News reported.

Read More Show Less
A fishmonger in Elmina, a fishing port in the Central Region of Ghana. Environmental Justice Foundation

By Daisy Brickhill

Each morning, men living in fishing communities along Ghana's coastline push off in search of the day's catch. But when the boats come back to shore, it's the women who take over.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Sam Nickerson

Links between excess sugar in your diet and disease have been well-documented, but new research by Harvard's School of Public Health might make you even more wary of that next soda: it could increase your risk of an early death.

The study, published this week in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation, found that drinking one or two sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) each day — like sodas or sports drinks — increases risk of an early death by 14 percent.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Krystal B / Flickr

Tyson Foods is recalling approximately 69,093 pounds of frozen chicken strips because they may have been contaminated with pieces of metal, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced Thursday.

The affected products were fully-cooked "Buffalo Style" and "Crispy" chicken strips with a "use by" date of Nov. 30, 2019 and an establishment number of "P-7221" on the back of the package.

"FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers' freezers," the recall notice said. "Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase."

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Hrefna Palsdottir, MS

Cold cereals are an easy, convenient food.

Read More Show Less
A tractor spraying a field with pesticides in Orem, Utah. Aqua Mechanical / CC BY 2.0

Environmental exposure to pesticides, both before birth and during the first year of life, has been linked to an increased risk of developing autism spectrum disorder, according to the largest epidemiological study to date on the connection.

The study, published Wednesday in BMJ, found that pregnant women who lived within 2,000 meters (approximately 1.2 miles) of a highly-sprayed agricultural area in California had children who were 10 to 16 percent more likely to develop autism and 30 percent more likely to develop severe autism that impacted their intellectual ability. If the children were exposed to pesticides during their first year of life, the risk they would develop autism went up to 50 percent.

Read More Show Less