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5 Places to Visit for Your Next Winter Escape

Adventure
Copal Tree Lodge / Facebook

By Brian Barth

Agricultural adventure awaits you in the lower latitudes. Here are a few ideas to salivate over, from the rootsy to the ritzy.


1. North Country Farms – Kilauea, Hawaii

This small organic farm near the famed Na Pali coast on the island of Kauai offers a single guest cottage, which rents for under $200 per night. Ensconced in tropical foliage, you'll have the option of picking your own produce and grilling local seafood on the lanai (that's Hawaiian for veranda).

2. Belle Mont Farm – Basseterre, St. Kitts and Nevis

This sprawling eco-resort, with rooms starting in the $200 to $300 range, includes 400 acres of farmland and the "world's most edible golf course." Dining options abound with multiple restaurants (mountainside, beach or 30-foot wood table out in the fields, your choice), plus a bar serving house-brand rum and a farm-fresh grocery delivery service for those booking one of the self-contained suites.

3. Kahanda Kanda – Galle Fort, Sri Lanka

Located on a traditional tea estate, you'll dine on meals prepared from the surrounding gardens—they'll even set up a table for two under the stars—before retiring to your private mini-villa, which can be had for under $300 a night (you get your own pool in the pricier villas).

4. Copal Tree Lodge – Punta Gorda, Belize

Rooms at this 12,000-acre eco-resort start at just $125 per night and come with views of the rainforest. Your food, however, will come from the 3,000-acre organic farm on-site that produces everything from eggs and vegetables to coffee, chocolate and rum.

5. Hacienda San Antonio – Comala, Mexico

In the volcanic highlands of south-central Mexico lies a very pricey farm stay—rooms start at $700 in the off-season. No detail is spared in the lodgings, as well as the food, 90 percent of which comes from a nearby biodynamic farm. The hacienda has a beachside sister resort nearby, supplied by the same farm, which is even more lavish.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

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