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5 Kinds of Tea You Should Drink for Optimal Health

Food

America’s love affair with coffee is deeply entrenched (and totally understandable), but more and more people are switching over to tea. Tea has been used as medicine for thousands of years and its health benefits have been lauded by health experts.

Tea is delicious, comforting, warm and healthy, but it’s also full of variety.

Tea is delicious, comforting, warm and healthy, but it’s also full of variety. There are many different options and types of tea you can brew at home; you aren’t limited to Earl Grey and green. Try one of these healthy cuppas if you’re starting to embark on a journey through the world of tea.

1. Oolong

Oolong tea is caffeinated and packed with energy-giving nutrients. It’s a great option for mornings and also for drinking before a workout. Oolong is thermogenic, which means that it’s been proven to boost fat-burning.

According to Inspyr, oolong is also known to reduce levels of triglycerides, a type of fat found in the blood that’s been linked to heart disease and other illnesses.

2. Green

No list of healthy teas would be complete without a nod to green tea. There’s a reason that green tea is so popular among yogis and health-conscious people: It’s packed with antioxidants, is thought to boost collagen production and may even help prevent cancer and heart disease due to its high levels of catechins (a type of antioxidant).

3. White

White tea is delicate and delicious and it’s also incredibly healthy. Just like green tea, white tea contains catechins and other antioxidants that may neutralize free radicals and protect against cancer and heart disease.

In an interview with Fox News Health, tea aficionado Zhena Muzyka explained that she considers white tea to be her “beauty tonic.” She explains that its age-fighting properties made it a beauty treatment in ancient Asia.

4. Ginger-citrus

Ginger is a known antimicrobial, which means that it can help fight bacteria. Inspyre notes that the combination of ginger, which contains zingiber and citrus fruits like lemons, which contain pectin and limonene, make for a strong immune-booster. Ginger has been used to fight illness since ancient times and citrus fruits help detoxify the body.

5. Chamomile

Chamomile tea is not made from an actual tea plant, but instead from the flowers of the chamomile plant. This is what allows chamomile tea to remain caffeine-free. Chamomile tea is thought to promote restful sleep, which is beneficial for optimal health. It also contains a variety of antioxidants that are thought to protect against cancer and diabetes.

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