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5 Horrifying Images from the Nepal Earthquake

A week after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake ripped through Nepal and parts of India and China, rescue workers continue to search through the rubble for survivors in Kathmandu, near the epicenter of the quake. The death toll has climbed to more than 6,000, including those who died in an avalanche on Mount Everest.

The Nepali government and outside aid are trying to help victims of the quake, which destroyed an estimated 130,000 homes, reports CBS News. The UN Children's Fund, or UNICEF, has delivered nearly 30 metric tons of supplies, including tents, water purification tablets, and first aid and hygiene kits.

These five images from Instagram capture the earthquake's devastating impact on the region:

5 month baby rescued live after 22 hours of #NepalQuake #Bhaktapur

A photo posted by Shilan Titaju (@s_tju) on

 

 

Coordinating health sector partners in support of Nepal’s government, WHO is striving to reach remote areas beyond Kathmandu where road access has been hampered by damage caused by ‪#‎NepalEarthquake. To date, Sindhupalchowk has reported the highest fatalities of any region in ‪#‎Nepal. Authorities say that at least 1400 people had died there, and warning that the number could rise to 3000. WHO is working with health authorities to get health workers in place to care for the injured, and prevent and control the spread of infectious diseases, including diarrhoea. Photo: WHO/A. Khan --- #NepalQuake #Earthquake #NepalEarthquakeRelief #Health #EmergencyResponse #WorldHealthOrganization #OMS #Sindhupalchowk #HealthWorkers #NepalQuakeResponse

A photo posted by World Health Organization (@worldhealthorganization) on

 

 

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