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5 Complications From Sitting on Your Toilet

Health + Wellness

Whether this is a foreign concept or one you’re familiar with, squatting to eliminate is in your best interest and using the Squatty Potty is the most convenient, safest way to squat.

The only natural defecation posture for a human being is squatting.

An ample amount of the western population with normal bowel movements have a difficult time emptying their bowels. Simple constipation is a result of habitual bowel elimination while sitting on modern toilets. The sitting angle chokes the rectum via the puborectalis muscle, which creates continence (or a kinked colon), but while we are squatting the puborectalis muscle is relaxed and the rectum is straightened making elimination easier and more effective.

5 Complications That Come With Sitting on Your Toilet

1. Constipation

Let’s face it: most of us don’t get the fiber and all the water we need. It’s true. These two things, along with improper toilet posture resulting in an incomplete elimination, are a bad combination that create hard dry stools. These hard dry stools are no fun to push out. It’s called constipation, and we’ve all experienced it. Unfortunately, it’s the norm for too many of us. But that’s just the beginning. Read more.

2. Hemorrhoids

Getting those hard stools out calls for lots of pushing (that could be avoided). That pressure causes hemorrhoids, which can be very painful. Hemorrhoids are inflamed anal varicose veins that have swollen because of our need to push excessively to get those hard stools to pass. But, as bad as hemorrhoids are, they aren’t the worst of our potential problems. Read more.

3. Colon Disease

Eliminating completely and often helps maintain good colon health. Many studies point to fecal buildup in the colon as a cause of diseases, including colon cancer. When there is buildup in the colon, our bodies can’t absorb all the nutrients from the food we eat, leaving us without the energy we could enjoy if our colons were healthy.

4. Urinary Difficulty/Infections

Urinary flow is usually stronger and easier when women squat to urinate. The bladder is emptied more completely when squatting rather than sitting or “hovering.” Squatting can help reduce episodes of urinary tract infections in both frequency and intensity. Now, that is good news!

5. Pelvic Floor Issues

One of the main causes of this condition is straining on the toilet. The “sitting” position causes a great amount of pressure on the anorectal angle of the colon causing the lower part of the colon to drop and protrude into the wall of the vagina. Pelvic floor nerves can be protected by squatting for bowel elimination. Men can also suffer from pelvic floor disorders and can readily benefit from using the Squatty Potty as a part of their everyday routine. Read more here and here.

Better health, greater comfort and more energy!

All these problems, and more, can be helped with the use of the Squatty Potty. This innovative, health-giving toilet stool is easy to use and highly effective in positioning the colon for effortless bowel movements. The Squatty Potty is sturdy and convenient. It even slides out of the way under your toilet when not in use.

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Squatty Potty Makes Me Feel Happy and Healthy

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