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5 Adventurous Reasons You've Got to Visit Sedona

If you've never been to Sedona, Arizona, you should add it to your bucket list. It's been said that "God created the Grand Canyon, but he lives in Sedona." I don't know about all that, but it's definitely worth a visit.

Its stunning red rock formations serve as a backdrop for all kinds of fun activities, from hiking and biking to wine tastings and soothing spa treatments.

Opportunity abounds for both adventure seekers and those looking for a little rest and relaxation. Photo credit: Anita Ritenour / Creative Commons

Here are five great reasons to visit Sedona:

1. Endless Outdoor Adventure

According to Outside, Sedona is a new mountain bike mecca. Photo credit: Paul Prough/Pinterest

Surrounded by 1.8 million acres of national forest land, four wilderness areas and two state parks, Sedona has so many things to do: hiking, biking, climbing, rafting, kayaking, you name it.

With more than 120 trails in Sedona, there's plenty to explore. And Sedona has recently emerged as the "new mountain bike mecca," according to Outside. In fact, the city hosted a mountain bike festival last weekend.

“One of the best things about Sedona is the variety,” Matt Mcfee, whose company Hermosa Tours guides visiting riders, told Outside. “There’s trail for everyone, and you can’t call any of it, even the easy stuff, boring.”

Looking for a more relaxed adventure? Then, check out Sedona Adventure Tours' "Water to Wine Tour," where you'll float the Verde River before indulging in a wine tasting at the Alcantara Vineyards.

2. Stay and Play Year-Round

Sedona is beautiful all year long, including in the winter when snow occasionally dusts the red rocks. Photo credit: Janet Ward/NOAA

One might argue Sedona is even more beautiful in the winter. Its far less crowded in the winter months. And visitors will enjoy ample sunshine, mild temperatures and might even get the chance to see the red rocks dusted by snow.

After a brisk hike or bike ride, visitors can unwind in the city's funky boutiques, galleries and spas.

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3. Sedona is a Very Spiritual Place

Native Americans hold many places around Sedona to be sacred. Photo credit: CEBImagery/Creative Commons

"Regarded by Native Americans as sacred, Sedona continues to be recognized as a place of healing and spiritual renewal," Visit Sedona said. "Many come to experience the vortex energy centers of Sedona."

No matter what, you are bound to get some rest and relaxation there. Sedona is home to "mystical bazaars" with psychic readers, yoga studios and spas offering massages, reiki and other healing therapies.

4. There's a Festival for Everyone in Sedona

The Sedona Arts Festival will take place this year on Oct. 8 and 9. Photo credit: Chris Connelly/Creative Commons

There's the previously mentioned mountain bike festival. But there's also an arts festival, a film festival and a yoga festival. Not enough for you? There's also a wine festival, a beer festival and many more annual events.

Some of the more uncommon festivals include a Dia de los Muertos celebration, Red Rocks Oktoberfest, and Bike and Brew Fest.

5. The Sunrises and Sunsets Are Breathtaking

Sedona is known for its absolutely stunning sunrises and sunsets. Photo credit: Wikipedia/Creative Commons

The pictures really speak for themselves. And while it's hard to find a bad spot to watch the sunrise or sunset in Sedona, there are some spots that offer particularly stunning views.

Somehow still not sold on Sedona? Then, watch this promo video from Visit Sedona:

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