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4 Places to Buy All-Natural Solid Wood Furniture for Kids

Health + Wellness

By Radha McLean

Engineered wood is being used more frequently than ever before for the construction of furniture as manufacturers seek out more affordable and durable alternatives to solid wood.


The land of Nod sells a large selection of cribs and beds using high quality solid wood from the poplar tree. Photo credit: The Land of Nod

Plywood, veneer and laminated boards are all processed materials made up of particles of wood that are bound together with an adhesive. While engineered wood can generally hold heavier weight, it contains formaldehyde and other chemical additives, according to Care 2. Parents seeking out all natural, solid wood furniture for their children can still find a number of options to choose from at both mainstream and specialized retailers.

The Land of Nod

This offshoot of Crate and Barrel specializing in children's products sells a large selection of cribs and beds using high quality solid wood from the poplar tree. The baby cribs and children's beds come in numerous finishes and designs, including bunk beds, trundle beds with drawers, and frames with customizable fabric headboards with playful prints. You can also purchase matching crib guard rails and bed toddler rails. According to the company's website, The Land of Nod is committed to “selling safe, high-quality products [that] meet or exceed all government and 3rd party safety standards." The products are also tested every year for safety and durability.

Kids Furniture Solutions

This one stop shop for children's furniture sells a vast selection of furniture and bedroom sets, from loft beds to captain beds to day beds and the company's signature staircase bunk beds. All products are made with 100 percent solid pine, and most orders are shipped for free. Some cool design features include bunk beds with built-in desks, twin beds with two levels of storage drawers and a convertible bunk that can be redesigned to a loft bed. Check the website for sales, which are offered on a continual basis.

Stuart David

This niche furniture maker from Central California specializes exclusively in solid wood furniture, with bedroom and playroom pieces for children of all ages. Its four children bedroom collections have distinctive country and modern looks with individual pieces that include platform and storage beds, storage chests and customized corner desks. Shoppers can even design their own collection by choosing their preferred style, layout, type of wood, finish color, handles and knobs. All items are made in the U.S. with solid oak or maple, water-based adhesives and finishes that emit low levels of VOCs (volatile organic compounds).

Lifetime Denmark

This Scandinavian company designs unique furniture for children that is hand crafted by carpenters from the Danish furniture factory M. Schack Engel A/S. All of their pieces are made of natural pine taken from controlled forestry. Some highlights among their children's furniture selection include the limited edition Life House Mid Sleeper Bed in Treehouse Style, made of solid knot free pine, and their practical 4-in-1 bed that converts from a toddler bed without legs to a basic bed with legs and a bed guard, then to a platform bed with a ladder, and finally to a standard twin bed. According to a statement on the company's website, all Lifetime products feature durable materials made to last a child's lifetime, with varnishes and stains that are water-based and environmentally friendly.

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