Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

35 Arrested Protesting Frac-Sand Mining Facilities

Energy

Winona Area Citizens Concerned About Silica Mining Winona Catholic Worker

On April 29, more than 100 people shut down silica sand mining operations simultaneously at two facilities in the city of Winona, MN. Thirty-five concerned citizens were arrested and cited on trespass charges. One woman was held and transferred to Hennepin County because of a previous action against silica sand mining. All others were released with a future court date. It was, to date, the largest protest against frac-sand mining.

Citizens protesting the frac-sand mining activity join arms to block 80,000 pound diesel trucks from bringing frac-sand into the Hemker washing facility in Winona, MN.

Half of the group was present at CD Corporation located at the Winona Port Authority where silica sand is loaded onto barges and shipped down the Mississippi River. Eighteen people blocked trucks from accessing the port to unload sand for nearly an hour. The other half of the group gathered on Goodview Road, where a sand washing and processing facility is located. Seventeen people occupied the driveway of the facility preventing trucks from entering and effectively shutting down operations for nearly two hours.

The Winona Catholic Worker community invited colleagues from across the Midwest to assist in the nearly two-year old local campaign to raise awareness and stop the process of extracting, processing and shipping silica sand. Members of 22 communities from nine states committed to nonviolence joined the weekend activities as part of the 11th annual Catholic Worker Faith and Resistance gathering.

Residents at the Winona County Law Enforcement Center, in support of the 35 people arrested protesting two frac-sand mining facilities in Winona, MN.

Last week, the group declared a moratorium on business as usual at all sites of mining, processing and transporting of silica sand, in order to eliminate a necessary component of fracking.

“We will not be complicit in the hydraulic fracturing industry, known for poisoning water and land across the country,” said Diane Leutgeb-Munson of Winona. “We will not stand by and watch our landscape be forever altered. If there is no other way to stop this from happening, we will simply stand in the way.”

By standing with the people of Winona, Winona Catholic Workers stands in solidarity with all communities impacted by fracking. As articulated in their statement of purpose:

We demand that this industry—the corporations , state and local officials, and those who unjustly profit from this culture of consumption and greed—put an end to fracking and silica sand mining.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

——–

Sign the petition today, telling President Obama to enact an immediate fracking moratorium:

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Heavy industry on the lower Mississippi helps to create dead zones. AJ Wallace on Unsplash.

Cutting out coal-burning and other sources of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from heavy industry, electricity production and traffic will reduce the size of the world's dead zones along coasts where all fish life is vanishing because of a lack of oxygen.

Read More Show Less

Despite the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, which has restricted the ability to gather in peaceful assembly, a Canadian company has moved forward with construction of the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, according to the AP.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A gas flare from the Shell Chemical LP petroleum refinery illuminates the sky on August 21, 2019 in Norco, Louisiana. Drew Angerer / Getty Images.

Methane levels in the atmosphere experienced a dramatic rise in 2019, preliminary data released Sunday shows.

Read More Show Less
A retired West Virginia miner suffering from black lung visits a doctor for tests. Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis via Getty Images

In some states like West Virginia, coal mines have been classified as essential services and are staying open during the COVID-19 pandemic, even though the close quarters miners work in and the known risks to respiratory health put miners in harm's way during the spread of the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less
Solar panel installations and a wind turbine at the Phu Lac wind farm in southern Vietnam's Binh Thuan province on April 23, 2019. MANAN VATSYAYANA / AFP via Getty Images

Renewable energy made up almost three quarters of all new energy capacity added in 2019, data released Monday by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) shows.

Read More Show Less