Quantcast

35 Arrested Protesting Frac-Sand Mining Facilities

Energy

Winona Area Citizens Concerned About Silica Mining Winona Catholic Worker

On April 29, more than 100 people shut down silica sand mining operations simultaneously at two facilities in the city of Winona, MN. Thirty-five concerned citizens were arrested and cited on trespass charges. One woman was held and transferred to Hennepin County because of a previous action against silica sand mining. All others were released with a future court date. It was, to date, the largest protest against frac-sand mining.

Citizens protesting the frac-sand mining activity join arms to block 80,000 pound diesel trucks from bringing frac-sand into the Hemker washing facility in Winona, MN.

Half of the group was present at CD Corporation located at the Winona Port Authority where silica sand is loaded onto barges and shipped down the Mississippi River. Eighteen people blocked trucks from accessing the port to unload sand for nearly an hour. The other half of the group gathered on Goodview Road, where a sand washing and processing facility is located. Seventeen people occupied the driveway of the facility preventing trucks from entering and effectively shutting down operations for nearly two hours.

The Winona Catholic Worker community invited colleagues from across the Midwest to assist in the nearly two-year old local campaign to raise awareness and stop the process of extracting, processing and shipping silica sand. Members of 22 communities from nine states committed to nonviolence joined the weekend activities as part of the 11th annual Catholic Worker Faith and Resistance gathering.

Residents at the Winona County Law Enforcement Center, in support of the 35 people arrested protesting two frac-sand mining facilities in Winona, MN.

Last week, the group declared a moratorium on business as usual at all sites of mining, processing and transporting of silica sand, in order to eliminate a necessary component of fracking.

“We will not be complicit in the hydraulic fracturing industry, known for poisoning water and land across the country,” said Diane Leutgeb-Munson of Winona. “We will not stand by and watch our landscape be forever altered. If there is no other way to stop this from happening, we will simply stand in the way.”

By standing with the people of Winona, Winona Catholic Workers stands in solidarity with all communities impacted by fracking. As articulated in their statement of purpose:

We demand that this industry—the corporations , state and local officials, and those who unjustly profit from this culture of consumption and greed—put an end to fracking and silica sand mining.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

——–

Sign the petition today, telling President Obama to enact an immediate fracking moratorium:

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Micromobility is the future of transportation in cities, but cities and investors need to plan ahead to avoid challenges. Jonny Kennaugh / Unsplash

By Carlo Ratti, Ida Auken

On the window of a bike shop in Copenhagen, a sign reads: Your next car is a bike.

Read More Show Less
An American flag waves in the wind at the Phillip Burton Federal Building in San Francisco, California on May 17 where a trial against Monsanto took place. Alva and Alberta Pilliod, were awarded more than $2 billion in damages in their lawsuit against Monsanto, though the judge in the case lowered the damage award to $87 million. JOSH EDELSON / AFP / Getty Images

By Carey Gillam

For the last five years, Chris Stevick has helped his wife Elaine in her battle against a vicious type of cancer that the couple believes was caused by Elaine's repeated use of Monsanto's Roundup herbicide around a California property the couple owned. Now the roles are reversed as Elaine must help Chris face his own cancer.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Butterfly habitats have fallen 77 percent in the last 50 years. Pixabay / Pexels

The last 50 years have been brutal for wildlife. Animals have lost their habitats and seen their numbers plummet. Now a new report from a British conservation group warns that habitat destruction and increased pesticide use has on a trajectory for an "insect apocalypse," which will have dire consequences for humans and all life on Earth, as The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less
Six of the nineteen wind turbines which were installed on Frodsham Marsh, near the coal-powered Fiddler's Ferry power station, in Helsby, England on Feb. 7, 2017.

Sales of electric cars are surging and the world is generating more and more power from renewable sources, but it is not enough to cut greenhouse gas emissions and to stop the global climate crisis, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency (IEA).

Read More Show Less
"Globally, we're starting to see examples of retailers moving away from plastics and throwaway packaging, but not at the urgency and scale needed to address this crisis." Greenpeace

By Jake Johnson

A Greenpeace report released Tuesday uses a hypothetical "Smart Supermarket" that has done away with environmentally damaging single-use plastics to outline a possible future in which the world's oceans and communities are free of bags, bottles, packaging and other harmful plastic pollutants.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Children are forced to wear masks due to the toxic smoke from peat land fires in Indonesia. Aulia Erlangga / CIFOR

By Irene Banos Ruiz

Pediatricians in New Delhi, India, say children's lungs are no longer pink, but black.

Our warming planet is already impacting the health of the world's children and will shape the future of an entire generation if we fail to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius (35.6°F), the 2019 Lancet Countdown Report on health and climate change shows.

Read More Show Less
Private homes surround a 20 inch gas liquids pipeline which is part of the Mariner East II project on Oct. 5, 2017 in Marchwood, Penn. Robert Nickelsberg / Getty Images

The FBI is looking into how the state of Pennsylvania granted permits for a controversial natural gas pipeline as part of a corruption investigation, the AP reports.

Read More Show Less
Three cows who were washed off their North Carolina island by Hurricane Dorian have been found alive after swimming at least two miles. Carolina Wild Ones / Facebook

Three cows who were washed off their North Carolina island by Hurricane Dorian have been found alive after swimming at least two miles, The New York Times reported Wednesday.

Read More Show Less