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3 Spectacular Videos of the Calbuco Volcano Eruption in Chile

The internet is full of stunning images and videos of the eruption of Calbuco volcano in southern Chile. The 6,500-foot Calbuco erupted twice on Wednesday and again early yesterday with an unbelievable lightning storm. The volcano last erupted in 1972 and is considered one of the top three most potentially dangerous among Chile's 90 active volcanos, according to The Weather Channel.

It's quite a coincidence that the eruption just happened because tonight's episode of Angry Planet features host George Kourounis descending into one of the world's most active volcanoes. The episode addresses the false claim made by climate deniers that volcanoes contribute more greenhouse gases to the atmosphere than the burning of fossil fuels.

Volcanoes are such a cool natural phenomena! Literally, cool since they temporarily cool the atmosphere with the sulfur dioxide and other aerosols that they emit when they erupt. Our members of Congress should probably brush up on basic science.

Check out these amazing videos of the eruption:

This is a clip from Wednesday's eruptions

And this is a video of the lava, smoke and lightning from yesterday

And here's a time lapse video of the eruption:

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Aerial view of Ruropolis, Para state, northen Brazil, on Sept. 6, 2019. Tthe world's biggest rainforest is under threat from wildfires and rampant deforestation. JOHANNES MYBURGH / AFP via Getty Images

By Kate Martyr

Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon rainforest last month jumped to the highest level since records began in 2015, according to government data.

A total of 563 square kilometers (217.38 square miles) of the world's largest rainforest was destroyed in November, 103% more than in the same month last year, according to Brazil's space research agency.

From January to November this year an area almost the size of the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico was destroyed — an 83% overall increase in destruction when compared with the same period last year.

The figures were released on Friday by the National Institute for Space Research (INPE), and collected through the DETER database, which uses satellite images to monitor forest fires, forest destruction and other developments affecting the rainforest.

What's Behind the Rise?

Overall, deforestation in 2019 has jumped 30% compared to last year — 9,762 square kilometers (approximately 3769 square miles) have been destroyed, despite deforestation usually slowing during November and December.

Environmental groups, researchers and activists blamed the policies of Brazil's president Jair Bolsonaro for the increase.

They say that Bolosonaro's calls for the Amazon to be developed and his weakening support for Ibama, the government's environmental agency, have led to loggers and ranchers feeling safer and braver in destroying the expansive rainforest.

His government hit back at these claims, pointing out that previous governments also cut budgets to environment agencies such as Ibama.

The report comes as Brazil came to loggerheads with the Association of Small Island States (AOSIS) over climate goals during the UN climate conference in Madrid.

AOSIS blasted Brazil, among other nations, for "a lack of ambition that also undermines ours."

Last month, a group of Brazilian lawyers called for Bolsonaro to be investigated by the International Criminal Court over his environmental policies.

Reposted with permission from DW.

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