Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

3 Reasons Why You Should Watch This Video on Fracking

Energy
3 Reasons Why You Should Watch This Video on Fracking

Ohio is in the heart of the shale gas boom. Our state has seen a recent explosion of fracking activity, and we’re bracing for even more development in the coming years.

Current Ohio law falls woefully short of establishing adequate protections from fracking for Ohio communities and families. This was demonstrated time and again in 2014, when we saw several major fracking accidents in our state alone. We’re nearing the one-year anniversary of a massive frack fire in Monroe county that resulted in the evacuation of 25 families, and severely polluted a nearby, once pristine stream, leaving a 5-mile fish kill in its wake.

The video below gives a quick breakdown of the current realities of fracking in Ohio and beyond, and the numerous ways it is threatening our environment, health and prosperity.

Here are three reasons why you should watch and share this video:

1. It’s not just happening in Ohio

Fracking is exploding across the country, and many states are feeling the consequences. According to FracTracker Alliance, an estimated 1.1 million wells have been or are being drilled in the U.S. With so many unanswered questions about the impact this can have on our environment, that number is alarming—to say the least.

2. Fracking causes .... earthquakes

That’s right, we have human activity triggering earthquakes. Although the majority of fracking related earthquakes have been tied to fracking fluid disposal in injection wells, an earthquake in Ohio just last year was connected to a nearby drilling site. USGS released a study that showed that many states, including Oklahoma and Ohio, have seen a dramatic increase in seismic activity since the shale boom.

3. Fracking threatens our water

The release of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water study last week confirms what fracking industry propaganda has long denied: there are specific cases of drinking water contamination resulting from fracking. The study revealed that our water is vulnerable at every stage of the fracking process. And in Ohio, fracking well pads can be within 50 feet of a stream.

To learn more watch here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Long-Awaited EPA Study Says Fracking Pollutes Drinking Water

Josh Fox Gets Kicked Off of Fox News While Exposing Misleading Coverage of EPA Fracking Report

Is the Fracking Boom Coming to an End?

A "trash tsunami" has washed ashore on the beaches of Honduras, endangering both wildlife and the local economy.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Long-finned pilot whales are seen during a 1998 stranding in Marion Bay in Tasmania, Australia. Auscape / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

More long-finned pilot whales were found stranded today on beaches in Tasmania, Australia. About 500 whales have become stranded, including at least 380 that have died, the AP reported. It is the largest mass stranding in Australia's recorded history.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A protest in solidarity with the Wetʼsuwetʼen's anti-pipeline struggle, at Canada House in Trafalgar Square on March 1, 2020 in London, England. More than 200 environmental groups had their Facebook accounts suspended days before an online solidarity protest. Ollie Millington / Getty Images

Facebook suspended more than 200 accounts belonging to environmental and Indigenous groups Saturday, casting doubt on the company's stated commitments to addressing the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The Västra Hamnen neighborhood in Malmö, Sweden, runs on renewable energy. Tomas Ottosson / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Harry Kretchmer

By 2030, almost a third of all the energy consumed in the European Union must come from renewable sources, according to binding targets agreed in 2018. Sweden is helping lead the way.

Read More Show Less
An Extinction Rebellion protester outside the Bank of England on Oct. 14, 2019 in London, England. John Keeble / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In another win for climate campaigners, leaders of 12 major cities around the world — collectively home to about 36 million people — committed Tuesday to divesting from fossil fuel companies and investing in a green, just recovery from the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch