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3 Reasons Why You Should Use Neem Oil on Your Skin

Health + Wellness

By Maggie McCracken

Natural beauty fanatics often rave about the benefits of neem oil. Derived from the neem tree, which is native to India, neem oil is an anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anti-oxidant substance with a history of use in Vedic medicine. According to Stylecraze, neem is often referred to as a "plant with promise," namely because of its healing benefits and multi-purpose usage.

Derived from the neem tree, which is native to India, neem oil is an anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anti-oxidant substance with a history of use in Vedic medicine.

Though neem has a lot of health and healing benefits, it's the oil's beauty benefits that most people are after these days. You may have read about the reasons you should apply oil to your skin. Here are a few of the reasons to consider neem as your oil of choice.

1. Great for Anti-Aging

Neem oil is loaded with antioxidants and fatty acids that make it amazing for slowing down the aging process. Oleic and linoleic acid are two of the major components of neem oil, which penetrate the skin and keep the lining of the cells soft and supple. Not to mention, using any kind of oil is a fantastic way to keep moisture in. Applying oil to the face will create a barrier between the air and the skin, preventing moisture loss and keeping the skin hydrated.

2. Helps Prevent Acne

Neem is incredibly anti-bacterial, which is one of the reasons it's been so widely used in Vedic medicine. Because of these anti-bacterial properties, it's a wonderful ally in the battle against acne.

If you have acne that's caused by bacteria, applying a thin layer of neem oil to the skin can help kill the bacteria that may be getting into your pores and causing blemishes. As an added benefit, the oil will keep the skin moisturized, which can heal acne by preventing dry skin flakes from clogging the pores.

3. Soothes Eczema-Prone Skin

Though neem oil cannot cure eczema—a condition involving dry, itchy skin that often runs in families—it can help soothe the skin and reduce inflammation. Just Neem explains why:

"Emollients are what dermatologists recommend for eczema. Substances that fill the gaps and cracks in the skin, prevent moisture loss and restore the protective barrier. Since Neem is especially high in important fatty acids and vitamin E and can quickly penetrate outer layers of skin, it is extremely effective in healing dry and damaged skin. Its strong antiseptic properties will also help to keep bacteria and secondary skin infections at bay."

Neem also contains nimbidin, nimbin and quercetin—three anti-inflammatory compounds that can soothe the skin and reduce eczema-caused redness and irritation. This makes neem oil a wonderful tool to have at your disposal if you have eczema.

Oils are a boon for skin health. Think about it: Your skin is already full of naturally produced oils that keep the skin elastic and hydrated. Supplementing with oils is a great way to keep your skin looking and feeling healthy as you age and neem oil is one of the best choices out there.

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