Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

3 Reasons Why Rand Paul Is Dead Wrong on Climate Change

Climate
3 Reasons Why Rand Paul Is Dead Wrong on Climate Change

Kentucky senator and GOP presidential candidate Rand Paul was once considered a moderate among his contemporaries in the Senate when it came to climate change. In January, he was one of only 15 Republican senators to vote in favor of an amendment, which said "climate change is real, and human activity significantly contributes to climate change."

Paul also told Bill Maher last year that "he's not against some regulations, such as on carbon emissions and clean water." However, once confirmed as GOP presidential candidate, Paul seems to have altered his climate change stance. In a field rife with climate denial, only two Republican candidates have spoken out about the need for climate action: South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham and former New York Gov. George Pataki.

At Tuesday's GOP primary debate in Milwaukee, Paul said the first thing he would do as president is repeal the Clean Power Plan. President Obama "has devastated my state," said Paul. "I say President Obama is not only destroying Kentucky, he's destroying the Democratic party down there because nobody wants to associate with him." However, according to Environmental Defense Fund, the Clean Power Plan "reduce[s] carbon emissions from power plant smokestacks—and by doing so it also creates new opportunities to continue development of the strong, vibrant clean energy economy that is creating prosperity."

He used a common climate denier argument: "While I do think man may have a role in our climate, I think nature also has a role." He added that the planet is 4.5 billion years old and has gone through many geologic eras with dramatic temperature changes, though this argument has been debunked again and again.

He argued that environmental regulations stymies economic growth. However, a new report from NextGen Climate America found that investing in renewable energy will create millions of jobs, increase GDP and raise household incomes. Meanwhile, the World Bank warns that left unchecked, global warming could push 100 million people into extreme poverty by 2030.

Watch Rand Paul's remarks here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Jon Stewart: ‘Are We Really Doing This Donald Trump Thing?’

The wildfires that roared through Eastern Washington in September had a devastating impact on an extremely endangered species of rabbit.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protestor in NYC holds up a sign that reads, "November Is Coming" on June 14, 2020 in reference to voting in the 2020 presidential election. Ira L. Black / Corbis / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard

What follows are not candidate endorsements. Rather, this nonpartisan guide aims to inform voters' choices, help journalists decide what races to follow, and explore what the 2020 elections could portend for climate action in the United States in 2021 and beyond.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Activists fight a peat fire in Siberia in September. ALEXANDER NEMENOV / AFP via Getty Images

The wildfires that ignited in the Arctic this year started earlier and emitted more carbon dioxide than ever before.

Read More Show Less
A metapopulation project in South Africa has almost doubled the population of cheetahs in less than nine years. Ken Blum / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Tony Carnie

South Africa is home to around 1,300 of the world's roughly 7,100 remaining cheetahs. It's also the only country in the world with significant cheetah population growth, thanks largely to a nongovernmental conservation project that depends on careful and intensive human management of small, fenced-in cheetah populations. Because most of the reserves are privately funded and properly fenced, the animals benefit from higher levels of security than in the increasingly thinly funded state reserves.

Read More Show Less
A new super enzyme feeds on the type of plastic that water and soda bottles are made of, polyethylene terephthalate (PET). zoff-photo / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Scientists are on the brink of scaling up an enzyme that devours plastic. In the latest breakthrough, the enzyme degraded plastic bottles six times faster than previous research achieved, as The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch