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3 Must-See TEDxManhattan Talks

Food

TEDxManhattan: Changing the Way We Eat took place March 7. In its fifth year, TEDxManhattan is organized by Diane Hatz of Change Food to help people “understand the food system on a broader scale.” The event brings together key experts in the field of sustainable food and farming. Each year, the event draws big names in the food movement such as Danielle Nierenberg of Food Tank, Tom Colicchio of Food Policy Action, Anna Lappé of Small Planet Institute and Wenonah Hauter of Food & Water Watch.

The organizers put together an 18-minute video with short clips from all of the speakers earlier this week. On Tuesday, the organizers began to upload the talks to their website with a dozen posted so far.

Here are the top three talks so far from this year's event:

Stefanie Sacks, a nutritionist and a mom, starts her talk with a video showing how she navigates the grocery store aisles with her two sons who want sugary, processed food like most American children. The video then shows how Sacks gets her two boys to help her cook wholesome, nutritious food at home. "While making healthy choices and cooking may be a burden to many, it's evidently my way of life and my kids' way of life," Sacks says. "I'm like everybody else. I deal with a six year old who loves sugar." But she holds firm to her principles and thinks every family needs to be having these conversations together because "small changes in every day food choices make big differences," Sacks says. Watch the video below to see how your every day choices can have a big impact on your life and what Sacks' recommendations are for sugar-obsessed kids:

Anim Steel, the executive director and co-founder of the Real Food Challenge, gave a talk about food justice, the unfulfilled promise of "40 acres and a mule" and the need to have "a vision of the food movement that is as deep as the problem." Steel asks, "How can we break through big structural problems with bold structural solutions?" Watch the video below to find out:

This talk begins with a video message from First Lady Michelle Obama who calls on Deb Eschmeyer, the White House executive director of Let’s Move! and senior policy advisor for nutrition policy, to drop and give her five (push ups, that is). Michelle Obama's "GimmeFive" campaign asks Americans around the country to show five ways they are leading a healthier lifestyle. Eschmeyer, of course, accepts and performs five push ups, and then she proceeds to offer her five ideas for a healthier America. Watch the video below to see what those five ideas are:

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