Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

3 Fracking Facts That Gov. Perry Forgot to Mention

Fracking

In response to Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R)’s wild claims about fracking on Fred Dicker’s Talk 1300 Radio program this morning, John Armstrong of Frack Action, on behalf of New Yorkers Against Fracking, wanted to remind Gov. Perry about some of the facts he forgot.

Fracking wells south of the West Texas town of Odessa.
Photo credit: Dennis Dimick / Flickr.

“Governor Perry suffered another colossal ‘oops’ failure today, forgetting the harms fracking is causing Texans each day under his administration," said Armstrong. "Although he’s in New York for 'job recruitment,' we expect he’s going to find that contaminated water, toxic air and a range of negative health impacts are not selling points. While he enjoys clean, frack-free New York water and air, we took the liberty of writing down three facts for Governor Perry."

1. Fracking contaminates water: A University of Texas study linked fracking to drinking water contamination with arsenic. The head of Texas A&M University’s Petroleum Engineering Department recently noted inherent problems with fracking. That’s in line with 2013 and 2011 studies from Duke University, high well casing failure rates, and widespread water contamination.

2. Fracking pollutes the air: An eight-month investigation recently revealed that fracking is releasing a "toxic soup of chemicals" into the air, linked to hundreds of reports of sickness, and that Gov. Perry's administration is failing to monitor or address the situation. That's even though the Colorado School of Public Health has identified air pollutants by fracking sites at sufficient levels to raise risks for cancer, neurological deficits and respiratory problems, American Lung Association data show alarming levels of air pollution near fracking, and a recent study found high levels of benzene and volatile organic compounds at fracking sites in rural Utah.

3. Fracking causes earthquakes: The Ohio Department of Natural Resources linked fracking to earthquakes this month, just as earthquakes have been tied to fracking in the United Kingdom, Canada, Mexico and elsewhere in the U.S. And Texas has its own history of earthquakes linked to fracking wastewater deep injection wells.

And if Gov. Perry can’t remember any of these points, this picture from fracking in Denton, TX in 2013 about sums up the experience:

Frac Stack Blowout In Texas Panhandle. Photo credit: drillingahead.com

——–

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Ohio Earthquakes Linked to Fracking, Companies Required to Test for Seismic Activity

Case Studies Show How Shale Boom Hurt Health and Infrastructure of Four Communities

Court Order Allows Fracking Company to Ban Local Woman From 40 Percent of County

——–

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

U.S. President Donald Trump listens as Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases speaks in the Rose Garden for the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on March 29 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Just over a month after proclaiming that the number of coronavirus cases in the U.S. would soon "be down to close to zero," President Donald Trump said during a press briefing on the White House lawn Sunday that limiting U.S. deaths from the pandemic to between 100,000 and 200,000 people would mean his administration and the country as a whole did "a very good job."

Read More Show Less
Dicamba is having a devastating impact in Arkansas and neighboring states. A farmer in Mississippi County, Arkansas looks at rows of soybean plants affected by dicamba. The Washington Post / Getty Images

Documents unearthed in a lawsuit brought by a Missouri farmer who claimed that Monsanto and German chemical maker BASF's dicamba herbicide ruined his peach orchard revealed that the two companies knew their new agricultural seed and chemical system would likely damage many U.S. farms, according to documents seen by The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Washington State Governor Jay Inslee and other leaders speak to the press on March 28, 2020 in Seattle. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Washington State has seen a slowdown in the infection rate of the novel coronavirus, for now, suggesting that early containment strategies have been effective, according to the Seattle NBC News affiliate.

Read More Show Less
A bushfire burns outside the Perth Cricket Stadium in Perth, Australia on Dec. 13, 2019. PETER PARKS / AFP via Getty Images

By Albert Van Dijk, Luigi Renzullo, Marta Yebra and Shoshana Rapley

2019 was the year Australians confronted the fact that a healthy environment is more than just a pretty waterfall in a national park; a nice extra we can do without. We do not survive without air to breathe, water to drink, soil to grow food and weather we can cope with.

Read More Show Less

By Fino Menezes

Everyone adores dolphins. Intelligent, inquisitive and playful, these special creatures have captivated humans since the dawn of time. But dolphins didn't get to where they are by accident — they needed to develop some pretty amazing superpowers to cope with their environment.

Read More Show Less