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3 Finalists Announced for Homegrown Solutions by Young Innovators Challenge

Climate

The New Cities Foundation and Connect4Climate announced yesterday the names of three outstanding project ideas that made it to the final stage of the Jakarta Urban Challenge, a US$20,000 contest aimed at tackling Jakarta’s mobility problems with homegrown solutions by young innovators. The finalists were selected from among the 226 applications that came from across Indonesia and from Indonesians living abroad.

The three finalists are:

Cyclist Urban System: A plan to create dedicated “cyclist hubs” across Jakarta, where cyclists can park their bikes, get dressed, buy refreshments, repair their bikes, obtain first aid assistance and route information, and eventually rent bikes.

Jalan Aman (Safe Passage): A mobile application that focuses on the safety of female commuters, allowing users to share their location, report incidences of assault and access information on safe transportation options from other users.

Squee Mobile App: A sharing app that unifies pedestrians and cyclists to travel together on shorter, safer non-motorized routes across Jakarta's urban kampongs (villages).

“The Jakarta Urban Challenge is an excellent platform to harness local intelligence from young innovators," said Lucia Grenna, program manager for Connect4Climate. "We were extremely humbled to see the diversity of concepts and thoughtful proposals that tackled mobility within Jakarta. Many of the submissions not only aimed to improve congestion, but also took climate change into consideration, and offered sustainable solutions. We look forward to working with the finalists to help them to realize their ideas.”

The three finalists will be invited to present their projects to an audience of 800 urban leaders and thinkers from around the world at the New Cities Summit, the leading event on the future of cities. The summit is taking place for the first time in Jakarta on June 9-11.

Each finalist will have five minutes to present their idea on the main stage of the Summit on June 9, where they will inspire the audience and compete to win approval from the international judging panel.

The judging panel will allocate the US$20K prize money into US$4,000 and US$6,000 amounts for the runners-up and US$10,000 for the winner. Projects will be judged according to the quality, content and impact of the presentations.

The winning line-up will be announced on June 10 and all three finalists will be required to use their prize money for the implementation of their projects in Jakarta.

“We are truly inspired by the ingenuity and creativity of the 226 applications we received," said John Rossant, chairman of the New Cities Foundation. "It is evident from their detail and vision that young Indonesians are fully engaged with the urbanization challenges faced by their country. We look forward to seeing the three finalist presentations at the New Cities Summit, as well as the five semi-finalists—and to witnessing the impact of these projects in Jakarta in months and years to come.”

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The judging panel includes:

Ke Fang, Lead Urban Transport Specialist, The World Bank Group

Sarwo Handayani, Head of Governor’s team for Development Acceleration, City of Jakarta

John Rossant, Chairman, New Cities Foundation

Sutanto Soehodho, Jakarta's Deputy Governor for Industry, Trade, and Transportation

Neli Triana, Senior Editor/Deputy Head of Metropolitan Desk, Kompas Muda

Muhammad Yunus, Nobel Peace Prize recipient and Founder, Grameen Bank

The finalists were selected for their outstanding responses to the challenge criteria, which called upon applicants to come up with new and fresh solutions that demonstrate the capacity to improve traffic congestion, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution and/or improve transport safety and accessibility in the city.

Applications covered a spectrum of categories including: behavior-changing campaigns, apps, bike sharing systems, ride-sharing systems, public transport infrastructure projects and air filtering mechanisms.

In total, 226 applications were received between March 16 and May 8. Due to an astounding number of excellent applications the New Cities Foundation and Connect4Climate is also recognizing five semi-finalists:

WeWalk: A mobile game aimed at encouraging Jakartans to move around by foot. Users are given challenges, and can accumulate points and obtain rewards for different ranges of walked distances.

Working Proxy: An online platform enabling people to find remote office locations in close proximity to their neighborhood, helping workers avoid long commutes. The platform also incorporates ride-sharing options, further alleviating congestion.

Project Karta: A one-stop solution app integrating Jakarta's public facilities, events, transportation services and e-commerce to reduce traffic and pollution. The app helps users find the most effective commuting options by integrating all existing transportation apps.

Jampang: A mobile and web application that provides daily guidance for Jakartan commuters. It offers information on all possible transport options, as well as details on weather, arrival times and calories burned when choosing different modes of transport.

CekPolusi.org: A website that provides real-time information on pollution in Jakarta through monitoring stations located in nine locations across the city. Users can learn about the air quality in their area as well as the impact of particular pollutants.

These five semi-finalists are invited to attend the New Cities Summit in Jakarta.

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