Quantcast

3 Changes That Could Be Coming to a Nutrition Label Near You

By Diana Vilibert

The nutrition label may be getting a makeover … but will its new look help you make healthier choices? That’s what the FDA is hoping. The new proposed nutrition labels will includes three major changes:

1. A more visible calorie count.

Calories are front and center on the new proposed label, set apart with a significantly larger, bolder font.

2. Larger, more realistic serving sizes.

People often underestimate how much they eat because they underestimate how many servings they’re consuming. The proposed label would feature updated serving sizes that better reflect how much people eat of certain foods—therefore better reflecting the actual number of calories they’re consuming.

3. A separate line for added sugars.

The new label will make it easier for consumers to distinguish between natural sugars (what you’ll find in fruit, for example) and added sugars (“empty calories” like candy, baked goods and sodas). Americans currently get 16 percent of their total calories from added sugars.

Here’s how the old label compares to the proposed new label:

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D. explains why they feel a change is due, stating “Today, people are eating differently—many current serving sizes, and the amount of calories and nutrients that go with them—are out of date.” She goes on to point out that the three major changes are “important elements to fighting obesity and certain other chronic diseases, and making healthier food choices.”

 

Visit EcoWatch’s TIPS and HEALTH pages for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The exact location of the prehistoric trees saved by firefighters has been kept a secret to protect them from contamination. NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment / CC BY 4.0

It looks as if firefighters in Australia have succeeded in saving a secret grove of prehistoric trees belonging to a species that dates back to the time of the dinosaurs.

Read More
The Boxberg Power Station in Germany, which burns lignite coal, on Oct. 13, 2019. Hans-Jörg von Schroeter / Flickr

Germany reached an agreement Thursday that will allow it to stop burning coal by 2038.

Read More
Sponsored
This photograph shows green photosynthetic cyanobacteria growing and mineralizing in the sand-hydrogel framework. The living material has similar strength to cement-base mortar. College of Engineering and Applied Science at Colorado University Boulder / EurekAlert!

Cement is a remarkable building material; it's cheap, durable and readily available. However, its production is a leading source of carbon dioxide emissions, coughing up 2.8 gigatons of emissions every year, as Advanced Science News reported.

Read More
Five members of Climate Direct Action are seen before a coordinated effort to turn off valves on a pipeline in four states. Shut it Down - Climate Direct Action

Internal documents from the Department of Homeland Security reveal that non-violent demonstrators targeting the oil industry were classified as "extremists," with some organization members listed alongside known white supremacists, as The Guardian reported.

Read More
Dan Gold / Unsplash

An additional 2,100 deaths from fatal injuries may occur in the U.S. every year from a 2 C rise in temperatures, which could have grave implications for global changes associated with the climate crisis.

Read More