Quantcast

3 Autopilot Fail Videos Show Why Tesla Owners Still Need to Keep Hands on Wheel

Business

Oct. 21, 2015 is Back to the Future Day, the day in Back to the Future Part II that Marty McFly and Doc Brown arrive in Hill Valley after traveling forward in time from 1985. So it's fitting to be talking about such a futuristic technology.

Last week, Stephen Colbert, a proud Tesla owner, told viewers of the Late Show that he woke up to find his Tesla could now drive itself. Colbert was ecstatic about the new update, which is added to the car through Wi-Fi, in the same way your phone gets updates. "This technology is self-driving towards us whether we like it or not,” said Colbert.

Though the latest update only makes the cars semi-autonomous, Tesla CEO Elon Musk estimates that a fully autonomous car might only be a few years away. Tesla warned on its blog that "the driver is still responsible for, and ultimately in control of, the car." If a Tesla on autopilot gets in an accident, it will still be the driver's fault. And according to The Guardian, Musk said: “We’re being especially cautious at this early stage, so we’re advising drivers to keep their hands on the wheel just in case. The software is very new.”

So of course, there were bound to be some mishaps. People have been posting videos of Tesla autopilot fails on the Internet.

Here are three such snafus:

1. In this one, the driver got busted by the Florida highway patrol because the autopilot was going 75 mph in a 60-mph zone. I guess his autopilot has a bit of a lead foot.

2. This "proud Tesla owner," who says he still considers it the best car he's ever owned, almost had a head on collision with an oncoming car. He explains how it happened in the description of his video.

3. In this video, the autopilot works perfectly, until the car got off the highway...

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

It’s Time to Jump on the Train to the Future: All Aboard the Low Carbon Express

20 Celebrities That Have Gone Solar

Dalai Lama: Climate Change Is Destroying Tibet’s ‘Roof of the World’

Colbert: I Woke Up Yesterday Morning and My Tesla Could Drive Itself

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A new report spotlights a U.N. estimate that at least 275 million people rely on healthy coral reefs. A sea turtle near the Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef is seen above. THE OCEAN AGENCY / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY

By Jessica Corbett

In a new report about how the world's coral reefs face "the combined threats of climate change, pollution, and overfishing" — endangering the future of marine biodiversity — a London-based nonprofit calls for greater global efforts to end the climate crisis and ensure the survival of these vital underwater ecosystems.

Read More
Half of the extracted resources used were sand, clay, gravel and cement, seen above, for building, along with the other minerals that produce fertilizer. Cavan Images / Cavan / Getty Images

The world is using up more and more resources and global recycling is falling. That's the grim takeaway from a new report by the Circle Economy think tank, which found that the world used up more than 110 billion tons, or 100.6 billion metric tons, of natural resources, as Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported.

Read More
Sponsored

By Gero Rueter

Heating with coal, oil and natural gas accounts for around a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. But that's something we can change, says Wolfgang Feist, founder of the Passive House Institute in the western German city of Darmstadt.

Read More
Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016. Markus Spiske / Unsplash

By George Citroner

  • Recent research finds that official government figures may be underestimating drug deaths by half.
  • Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016.
  • Drug use decreases life expectancy after age 15 by 1.4 years for men and by just under 1 year for women, on average.

Government records may be severely underreporting how many Americans die from drug use, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University.

Read More
Water coolers in front of shut-off water fountains at Center School in Stow, MA on Sept. 4, 2019 after elevated levels of PFAS were found in the water. David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In a new nationwide assessment of drinking water systems, the Environmental Working Group found that toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS are far more prevalent than previously thought.

Read More