Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Join 24 Hours of Reality: Be the Voice of Reality on December 4-5

Climate

Twenty-four hours of inspiring stories of regular people taking their future into their hands and taking action on climate.

Twenty-four hours of eye-opening conversations with the business innovators, government leaders, scientists, community voices and more leading the fight for solutions all around the planet. Names like New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, California Gov. Jerry Brown and World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman Klaus Schwab.


Twenty-four hours of electrifying musical performances from some of the great names of pop music and fresh new voices. Artists like Annie Lennox, Belinda Carlisle, Billy Bragg, Ellie Goulding, Iggy Pop, Jason Mraz, Maná, Nile Rodgers, Rag'n'Bone Man and Young Paris.

Twenty-four hours of inspiration for all of us to be the voice of reality and millions to speak up for the planet we want.

On Dec. 4-5, we're presenting the global broadcast event, 24 Hours of Reality: Be the Voice of Reality, hosted by former Vice President Al Gore, streaming live at 24hoursofreality.org and presented locally by television partners around the world.

For 24 hours, we'll travel around the Earth, telling stories of real people making a real difference for the climate. We'll talk to some of the most interesting and intriguing leaders in every sector of business, activism, policy and more who are changing how we create energy, power our economies, and live our everyday lives, everywhere from New York to New Delhi. Along the way, we'll see stirring performances from today's most dynamic musicians.

Most important, we'll show a world moving forward to a clean energy future. And we'll show you how you can help.

If you're ready to make a difference and join millions worldwide in speaking up as the voice of reality, join us on December 4-5. Visit 24hoursofreality.org for the full lineup and program details.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Aerial shot top view Garbage trucks unload garbage to a recycle in the vicinity of the city of Bangkok, Thailand. bugto / Moment / Getty Images

German researchers have identified a strain of bacterium that not only breaks down toxic plastic, but also uses it as food to fuel the process, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a policy memo yesterday that is an expansive relaxation of legally mandated regulations on polluting industries, saying that industries may have trouble adhering to the regulations while they are short-staffed during the coronavirus global pandemic, according to the AP.

Read More Show Less
Hurricane Dorian was one of the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season's most devastating storms. NASA

2019 marked the fourth year in a row that the Atlantic hurricane season saw above-average activity, and it doesn't look like 2020 will provide any relief.

Read More Show Less