Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

230 Businesses and Politicians Call on Obama to Harness Offshore Wind

Business
230 Businesses and Politicians Call on Obama to Harness Offshore Wind

A massive coalition of nonprofit organizations, businesses and General Assembly members banded together today for a single cause—pushing the Obama Administration for offshore wind development in the U.S.

The 230-plus-member group wrote a letter to the president arguing that he should "redouble" support for offshore wind projects. The group says offshore wind is in line with Obama's Climate Action Plan as well as his recent demand to triple federal use of renewable energy. There are no offshore projects in the U.S., though a handful of proposals exist.

The U.S. has potential for its own offshore wind developments like this one in in the Baltic Sea off the coast of Copenhagen, Denmark, a 230-plus-member coalition says.
Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

According to the group, there are more than 4,000 gigawatts (GW) of offshore wind potential along U.S. coastlines. About 1,300 GW are along the Atlantic coast alone, which is the equivalent of powering 85 million American homes and removing more than 100 million cars from U.S. road.

"Swift action is urgently needed to tap this low-carbon, plentiful American resource," the letter reads. "Despite significant recent progress, there are still no wind energy projects off our coasts. Your continued leadership is essential to prioritize the development of pollution-free offshore wind power so that America can begin reaping its significant environmental and economic benefits."

Here are the four calls to action made by the Sierra Club, Union of Concerned Scientists and hundreds more:

  • Set a bold goal for offshore wind development in the Atlantic, consistent with the Department of Energy’s (DOE) current goal of 54 GW by 2030.

  • Support critical investments in offshore wind power including federal incentives and support for federal research, development and deployment programs at both Department of Interior and DOE.

  • Spur markets for offshore wind power, through power purchase commitments and collaboration among key agencies including the federal departments of defense, energy and commerce with state and regional economic development and energy agencies.

  • Ensure that offshore wind projects are sited, built and operated responsibly in order to avoid, minimize and mitigate conflicts with marine life and other ocean uses. Wind energy development should be consistent with the National Ocean Policy and key state and regional planning efforts.

“Hurricane Sandy was a tragic example of what climate change looks like. To avoid the worst impacts of global warming, we need to shift away from dirty energy that threatens our climate with carbon,” said Environment America’s Federal Global Warming Program director Julian Boggs.

“Harnessing the wind that blows off our shores will be essential in facing the climate crisis.”

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

LumiNola / E+ / Getty Images

By Gwen Ranniger

Fertility issues are on the rise, and new literature points to ways that your environment may be part of the problem. We've rounded up some changes you can make in your life to promote a healthy reproductive system.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Seattle-based Community Loaves uses home bakers to help those facing food insecurity during the pandemic. Sol de Zuasnabar Brebbia / Getty Images

By Lynn Freehill-Maye

The irony hit Katherine Kehrli, the associate dean of Seattle Culinary Academy, when one of the COVID-19 pandemic's successive waves of closures flattened restaurants: Many of her culinary students were themselves food insecure. She saw cooks, bakers, and chefs-in-training lose the often-multiple jobs that they needed simply to eat.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Storks in a nest near a construction crane. In the past 50 years, America's bird populations have fallen by a third. Maria Urban / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

What does a biodiversity crisis sound like? You may need to strain your ears to hear it.

Read More Show Less
The Biden administration is temporarily using Obama-era calculations of the "social cost" of three greenhouse gas pollutants while calculating a more accurate estimate. Bloomberg Creative / Getty Images

The Biden administration announced it will use Obama-era calculations of the "social cost" of three greenhouse gas pollutants while an interagency working group calculates a more complete estimate, the White House announced Friday.

Read More Show Less
Posts about climate change will now automatically be labelled with an information banner that directs people to accurate climate science data at Facebook's Climate Science Information Center. Facebook

By Anne-Sophie Brändlin

Facebook has started tackling dangerous climate change myths and anti-environment propaganda that circulates among the platform's almost 3 billion monthly users.

Read More Show Less