Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

2020’s New Vegan Cookbooks Will Tempt Your Taste Buds All Year Long

Food
Vegan Cookbooks

By Elizabeth Brion

When I went vegan in 1988, there were, as far as I could tell, only two vegan cookbooks in existence. I probably made every recipe in them at least a few dozen times. Thankfully, things are very different today. It's nearly impossible to keep up with the hundreds and hundreds of vegan cookbooks that have been released over the last decade or so. To help you narrow down which you should buy, here's a list of 2020 vegan cookbooks that we're most looking forward to. Whether you're looking to stop supporting the horrific treatment of sensitive and intelligent animals in animal agriculture, start helping to preserve what remains of our natural environment, or improve your own health (or hey, why not all three?), these cookbooks will help make it simple—and delicious—to do so.



BOSH!: Healthy Vegan

BOSH! is the biggest and fastest-growing plant-based food channel on the web, reaching more than 25 million people—and in this case, 25 million people definitely aren't wrong. Henry Firth and Ian Theasby reliably come up with crave-worthy, imaginative recipes that are easy and fun to follow. This is their third cookbook, which will be focused on healthier fare, and it hits stores on January 28.

Vegetable Kingdom: The Abundant World of Vegan Recipes

A new cookbook from James Beard Award–winning chef and food justice activist Bryant Terry is always excellent news, and when it's his first in nearly six years, it's a save-the-date occasion (February 11, for the record). Terry's recipes are healthy, innovative, and intensely flavorful. A few I'm looking forward to are Barbecued Carrots with Slow-Cooked White Beans, Citrus & Garlic-Herb-Braised Fennel, and Caramelized Leek & Seared Mushroom Toast.

Eat for the Planet Cookbook

This follow-up to the eye-opening 2018 book Eat for the Planet contains animal- and planet-friendly recipes from a host of top vegan chefs, restaurants, and companies—even a few from our PETA coworkers! If you're not familiar with the devastating effect of animal agriculture on our planet, this book will bring you up to speed and show you how to counter it without sacrificing flavor.

So Vegan in 5 Ingredients

A number of books have focused on vegan recipes with five or fewer ingredients, but this one by Roxy Pope and Ben Pook caught my attention when I saw a recipe for five-ingredient, from-scratch ravioli. I know, right? Other intriguing options include Rich Ragu, Super Squash Sheet Pan Bake, and Grilled Cinnamon Plums.

Southern Vegan: Delicious Down-Home Recipes for Your Plant-Based Diet

A totally objective fact: Vegan comfort food based on traditions of the American South is the best thing in the world. Thanks to Lauren Hartmann—the creator of the Rabbit and Wolves website—even if you're not lucky enough to live near a restaurant specializing in this cuisine, you can now make beignets, chicken biscuits, pot pies, jalapeño hushpuppies, and Mississippi mud cheesecake without harming any animals.

Love Is Served: Inspired Plant-Based Recipes From Southern California

Although it started out in San Francisco, Café Gratitude is probably the most Southern California restaurant in Southern California: All of its dish names are positive self-affirmations. It's a cute gimmick that's backed up with seriously legit food. Now you can serve its most beloved recipes—including "I Am Warm-Hearted" (grilled polenta with mushroom ragout), "I Am Gracious" (sundried tomato pesto grain salad), and "I Am Passionate" (black lava cake)—in your own home. Whether you require your family to say, "Could you please pass the 'I Am Fearless'?" is totally up to you.

Gluten-Free, Vegan Cooking in Your Instant Pot: 65 Delicious Whole Food Recipes for a Plant-Based Diet

Kathy Hester is the author of a number of specialized vegan cookbooks. Her books on recipes for air fryers and slow cookers are well-worn favorites at my house, and if you're one of the many people who have simplified their cooking routines with an Instant Pot, I'm sure this book will be similarly indispensable for you. The vegan, gluten-free recipes range from Chickpeas and Dumplings and Veggie Hunter's Lentil Quinoa Stew to from-scratch yogurt and sliceable cheese and Almond Berry Cake.

Wait, That’s Vegan?!: Plant-Based Meatballs, Burgers, Steaks and Other Dishes You Thought You’d Never Eat Again!

Full disclosure: I was drawn to this book because the first part of the title is something people say to me all the time. This cookbook from first-time author and plant-based nutritionist Lisa Dawn Angerame focuses on delicious vegan versions of familiar dishes such as meatballs, burgers, pasta with Bolognese sauce, and egg salad. It's a great option for new and aspiring vegans who are worried that they'll have to eat strange new food—or for experienced vegans who still sometimes crave the flavors of their childhood.

Vegan Yack Attack’s Plant-Based Meal Prep: Weekly Meal Plans and Recipes to Streamline Your Vegan Lifestyle

Cookbooks often say that they're designed for busy people, but I've never been more confident that's actually true than when I read that Jackie Sobon's upcoming one includes the category "Car Breakfasts." In addition to recipes, the book contains shopping lists, checklists, and a step-by-step guide for making prep day as efficient as possible. In short, I really need this book. Maybe you do, too.

Reposted with permission from PETA.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Dr. Jane Goodall, the world-renowned conservationist, desperately wants the world to pay attention to what she sees as the greatest threat to humanity's existence. Craig Barritt / Getty Images for TIME

By Jeff Berardelli

While COVID-19 and protests for racial justice command the world's collective attention, ecological destruction, species extinction and climate change continue unabated. While the world's been focused on other crises, an alarming study was released warning that species extinction is now progressing so fast that the consequences of "biological annihilation" may soon be "unimaginable."

Read More Show Less
A Starbucks employee in a mask and face shield at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Arlington, Virginia, on May 12, 2020. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP via Getty Images

Anyone entering a U.S. Starbucks from July 15 will have to wear a face mask, the company announced Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Supporters cheer before Trump arrives for a rally at the BOK Center on June 20, 2020 in Tulsa, OK. Jabin Botsford / The Washington Post via Getty Images

On Monday and Tuesday of the week that President Donald Trump held his first rally since March in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the county reported 76 and 96 new coronavirus cases respectively, according to POLITICO. This week, the county broke its new case record Monday with 261 cases and reported a further 206 cases on Tuesday. Now, Tulsa's top public health official thinks the rally and counterprotest "likely contributed" to the surge.

Read More Show Less
In the tropics, farmers often slash and burn forests to clear fertile land for crops, but a new method avoids that technique. Inga Foundation video

Rainforests are an important defense against climate change because they absorb carbon. But many are being destroyed on a massive scale.

Read More Show Less
A truck spreads lime on a meadow to increase the soil's fertility in Yorkshire Dales, UK. Farm Images / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

As we look for advanced technology to replace our dependence on fossil fuels and to rid the oceans of plastic, one solution to the climate crisis might simply be found in rocks. New research found that dispersing rock dust over farmland could suck billions of tons of carbon dioxide from the air every year, according to the first detailed large scale analysis of the technique, as The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less
Global heating imposes a harsh cost at the most critical time of all: the moment of spawning. Pxfuel

By Tim Radford

German scientists now know why so many fish are so vulnerable to ever-warming oceans. Global heating imposes a harsh cost at the most critical time of all: the moment of spawning.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Guillain-Barre syndrome occurs when the body's own immune system attacks and injures the nerves outside of the spinal cord or brain – the peripheral nervous system. Niq Steele / Getty Images

By Sherry H-Y. Chou, Aarti Sarwal and Neha S. Dangayach

The patient in the case report (let's call him Tom) was 54 and in good health. For two days in May, he felt unwell and was too weak to get out of bed. When his family finally brought him to the hospital, doctors found that he had a fever and signs of a severe infection, or sepsis. He tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 infection. In addition to symptoms of COVID-19, he was also too weak to move his legs.

When a neurologist examined him, Tom was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre Syndrome, an autoimmune disease that causes abnormal sensation and weakness due to delays in sending signals through the nerves. Usually reversible, in severe cases it can cause prolonged paralysis involving breathing muscles, require ventilator support and sometimes leave permanent neurological deficits. Early recognition by expert neurologists is key to proper treatment.

We are neurologists specializing in intensive care and leading studies related to neurological complications from COVID-19. Given the occurrence of Guillain-Barre Syndrome in prior pandemics with other corona viruses like SARS and MERS, we are investigating a possible link between Guillain-Barre Syndrome and COVID-19 and tracking published reports to see if there is any link between Guillain-Barre Syndrome and COVID-19.

Some patients may not seek timely medical care for neurological symptoms like prolonged headache, vision loss and new muscle weakness due to fear of getting exposed to virus in the emergency setting. People need to know that medical facilities have taken full precautions to protect patients. Seeking timely medical evaluation for neurological symptoms can help treat many of these diseases.

What Is Guillain-Barre Syndrome?

Guillain-Barre syndrome occurs when the body's own immune system attacks and injures the nerves outside of the spinal cord or brain – the peripheral nervous system. Most commonly, the injury involves the protective sheath, or myelin, that wraps nerves and is essential to nerve function.

Without the myelin sheath, signals that go through a nerve are slowed or lost, which causes the nerve to malfunction.

To diagnose Guillain-Barre Syndrome, neurologists perform a detailed neurological exam. Due to the nerve injury, patients often may have loss of reflexes on examination. Doctors often need to perform a lumbar puncture, otherwise known as spinal tap, to sample spinal fluid and look for signs of inflammation and abnormal antibodies.

Studies have shown that giving patients an infusion of antibodies derived from donated blood or plasma exchange – a process that cleans patients' blood of harmful antibodies - can speed up recovery. A very small subset of patients may need these therapies long-term.

The majority of Guillain-Barre Syndrome patients improve within a few weeks and eventually can make a full recovery. However, some patients with Guillain-Barre Syndrome have lingering symptoms including weakness and abnormal sensations in arms and/or legs; rarely patients may be bedridden or disabled long-term.

Guillain-Barre Syndrome and Pandemics

As the COVID-19 pandemic sweeps across the globe, many neurologic specialists have been on the lookout for potentially serious nervous system complications such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

Though Guillain-Barre Syndrome is rare, it is well known to emerge following bacterial infections, such as Campylobacter jejuni, a common cause of food poisoning, and a multitude of viral infections including the flu virus, Zika virus and other coronaviruses.

Studies showed an increase in Guillain-Barre Syndrome cases following the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic, suggesting a possible connection. The presumed cause for this link is that the body's own immune response to fight the infection turns on itself and attacks the peripheral nerves. This is called an "autoimmune" condition. When a pandemic affects as many people as our current COVID-19 crisis, even a rare complication can become a significant public health problem. That is especially true for one that causes neurological dysfunction where the recovery takes a long time and may be incomplete.

The first reports of Guillain-Barre Syndrome in COVID-19 pandemic originated from Italy, Spain and China, where the pandemic surged before the U.S. crisis.

Though there is clear clinical suspicion that COVID-19 can lead to Guillain-Barre Syndrome, many important questions remain. What are the chances that someone gets Guillain-Barre Syndrome during or following a COVID-19 infection? Does Guillain-Barre Syndrome happen more often in those who have been infected with COVID-19 compared to other types of infections, such as the flu?

The only way to get answers is through a prospective study where doctors perform systematic surveillance and collect data on a large group of patients. There are ongoing large research consortia hard at work to figure out answers to these questions.

Understanding the Association Between COVID-19 and Guillain-Barre Syndrome

While large research studies are underway, overall it appears that Guillain-Barre Syndrome is a rare but serious phenomenon possibly linked to COVID-19. Given that more than 10.7 million cases have been reported for COVID-19, there have been 10 reported cases of COVID-19 patients with Guillain-Barre Syndrome so far – only two reported cases in the U.S., five in Italy, two cases in Iran and one from Wuhan, China.

It is certainly possible that there are other cases that have not been reported. The Global Consortium Study of Neurological Dysfunctions in COVID-19 is actively underway to find out how often neurological problems like Guillain-Barre Syndrome is seen in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Also, just because Guillain-Barre Syndrome occurs in a patient diagnosed with COVID-19, that does not imply that it was caused by the virus; this still may be a coincident occurrence. More research is needed to understand how the two events are related.

Due to the pandemic and infection-containment considerations, diagnostic tests, such as a nerve conduction study that used to be routine for patients with suspected Guillain-Barre Syndrome, are more difficult to do. In both U.S. cases, the initial diagnosis and treatment were all based on clinical examination by a neurological experts rather than any tests. Both patients survived but with significant residual weakness at the time these case reports came out, but that is not uncommon for Guillain-Barre Syndrome patients. The road to recovery may sometimes be long, but many patients can make a full recovery with time.

Though the reported cases of Guillain-Barre Syndrome so far all have severe symptoms, this is not uncommon in a pandemic situation where the less sick patients may stay home and not present for medical care for fear of being exposed to the virus. This, plus the limited COVID-19 testing capability across the U.S., may skew our current detection of Guillain-Barre Syndrome cases toward the sicker patients who have to go to a hospital. In general, the majority of Guillain-Barre Syndrome patients do recover, given enough time. We do not yet know whether this is true for COVID-19-related cases at this stage of the pandemic. We and colleagues around the world are working around the clock to find answers to these critical questions.

Sherry H-Y. Chou is an Associate Professor of Critical Care Medicine, Neurology, and Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh.

Aarti Sarwal is an Associate Professor, Neurology, Wake Forest University.

Neha S. Dangayach is an Assistant Professor of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Disclosure statement: Sherry H-Y. Chou receives funding from The University of Pittsburgh Clinical Translational Science Institute (CTSI), the National Institute of Health, and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Dean's Faculty Advancement Award. Sherry H-Y. Chou is a member of Board of Directors for the Neurocritical Care Society. Neha S. Dangayach receives funding from the Bee Foundation, the Friedman Brain Institute, the Neurocritical Care Society, InCHIP-UConn Center for mHealth and Social Media Seed Grant. She is faculty for emcrit.org and for AiSinai. Aarti Sarwal does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Reposted with permission from The Conversation.