Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

20 Most Sustainable Food and Health Solutions on the Planet

Business

Editor’s note: This is part three of our look at various aspects of the Sustainia100. Here are parts onetwofourfive and six.

Sustainable solutions in food and health extend well beyond the wellness of the individual digesting a particular food or using a certain product. Some companies and organizations focus on minimizing water and energy use, while others incentivize their communities for making healthy choices.

Variety doesn't even begin to describe the food and health solutions found in the Sustainia100. Between the two categories, you'll find protein bars made with cricket flour, animal feed created with fly larvae and menstrual pads made with banana fiber.

Sustainia’s research team reviewed more than 900 projects before selecting the 10-category list of 100. The Sustainia100 Advisory Board consists of 21 sector experts from 11 international research organizations. Here are the 10 solutions from food and health:

Food

  1. Netafim: Drip irrigation maximizes crop yields for smallholder farmers
  2. AgriProtein Technologies: Harvesting larvae from waste for animal feed
  3. Mitticool: Clay refrigerator cools through evaporation
  4. BioTrans Nordic: Reusing food waste as energy and fertilizer
  5. International Rice Research Institute and Syngenta: Monitoring water levels for smarter rice irrigation
  6. Groasis: Growing trees in deserts with minimal water use
  7. Exo: Cricket flour for high-protein bars
  8. Marrone Bio Innovations: Bio-based products for pest Management and plant health
  9. West African Fish: Green fish farming fosters local growth
  10. Hotel Union Geiranger: Smaller plates at buffets reduce food waste

Health

  1. We Care Solar: Solar suitcases light up maternal health care
  2. Robohand: Open-source software for 3D-printed prosthetics
  3. FairShare CSA Coalition: Health care rebate for healthy eating choices
  4. Peek Vision: Smartphones helping to prevent blindness
  5. Sustainable Health Enterprises: Menstrual pads made from banana fiber
  6. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP: Designing hospitals to maximize daylight
  7. ClickMedix: Quality health care through eHealth platform
  8. Desso: Carpets that clean the air for better indoor climates
  9. Mali Health Organizing Project: Broadcasting health information to slum communities
  10. D-Rev and Phoenix Medical Systems: Phototherapy for neonatal jaundice in low-income hospitals

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The recovery of elephant seals is one of the "signs of hope" that scientists say show the oceans can recover swiftly if we let them. NOAA / CC BY 2.0

The challenges facing the world's oceans are well known: plastic pollution could crowd out fish by 2050, and the climate crisis could wipe out coral reefs by 2100.

Read More Show Less
A schoolchildren crossing sign is seen in front of burned trees in Mallacoota, Australia on Jan. 15, 2020. Luis Ascui / Getty Images

By Bhiamie Williamson, Francis Markham and Jessica Weir

The catastrophic bushfire season is officially over, but governments, agencies and communities have failed to recognize the specific and disproportionate impact the fires have had on Aboriginal peoples.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Workers convert the Scottish Events Campus, where COP26 was to be held, into a field hospital to treat COVID-19 patients. ANDY BUCHANAN / AFP via Getty Images

The most important international climate talks since the Paris agreement was reached in 2015 have been delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
An aerial view of a crude oil storage facility of Caspian Pipeline Consortium (CPC) in the Krasnodar Territory. Vitaly Timkiv / TASS / Getty Images

Oil rigs around the world keep pulling crude oil out of the ground, but the global pandemic has sent shockwaves into the market. The supply is up, but demand has plummeted now that industry has ground to a halt, highways are empty, and airplanes are parked in hangars.

Read More Show Less
Examples (from left) of a lead pipe, a corroded steel pipe and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. U.S. EPA Region 5

Under an agreement negotiated by community groups — represented by NRDC and the Pennsylvania Utility Law Project — the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) will remove thousands of lead water pipes by 2026 in order to address the chronically high lead levels in the city's drinking water and protect residents' health.

Read More Show Less