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20 Best Ways to #SaveThePlanetIn4Words

Climate
20 Best Ways to #SaveThePlanetIn4Words

With the Pope honing in on his climate message in his first ever visit to the U.S., and world leaders gearing up for the UN Paris climate talks, climate change and other pressing environmental issues are finally getting more attention on the worldwide stage.

People have taken to Twitter to offer their serious and not so serious ideas of how to #SaveThePlanetIn4Words. Many people were pleading "Don't Vote For Trump." Also popular was "Cancel The Kardashians Immediately." Sorry, Kourtney and Khloe.

Here are my favorite 20 best ideas:

1. By far one of the most popular solutions

2. Go 100 percent renewable

3. See number 2 for additional guidance on this one

4. Let's protect our oceans

5. This is good for you and the planet

 

6. You know, they say his word is infallible

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7. #CatLivesMatter

 

8. Just common sense

9. Save the bees

10. Save the trees

11. Your mom was right. Eat your veggies!

12. As Pope Francis says, it's the "dung of the devil"

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13. Something I think we can all get on board with

14. Climate change affects everyone, so we all need to join together

 

15. Though it would technically be five words, I have to agree with you on this one

16. This goes without saying, but without water we die

17. Not a bad idea

18. Well, we know this isn't going to happen

19. So let's do this

20. But don't forget

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