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2 Foodies Discuss 6 Top Food Trends in 2015

Food
2 Foodies Discuss 6 Top Food Trends in 2015

On today's Here & Now, host Jeremy Hobson talked with foodies Kathy Gunst, resident chef for Here & Now, and J.M. Hirsch, food editor for the Associated Press, about some of the trends in food for 2015.

Savory yogurt is one of this year’s top food trends. Photo credit: Blue Hill Yogurt / Facebook page

Several trends that the guests identified include, savory yogurt, butter and full-fat dairy, mini vegetables and "new" whole grains such as freekeh, hemp, chia and spelt.

"People are realizing that we've moved beyond the Snackwells era, and we can actually enjoy whole ingredients," said Hirsch. "People are realizing that there's no one nutrient that's the bad guy and if we focus on whole foods, being whole grains and whole fat dairy and produce, we're actually eating a healthier diet than worrying about what to eliminate this day."

Gunst mentions that "Blue Hill restaurant outside of New York City is making butternut squash and beet yogurt." Hirsh mentions how more pop-up restaurants from big-name chefs trying out new concepts is growing fast.

Listen here as Hobson talks with these two food gurus who "spot trends by reading everything they can about food, eating at restaurants and talking to people at grocery stores."

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