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178 Nations Switched Off Lights to Mark the 10th Annual Earth Hour

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178 Nations Switched Off Lights to Mark the 10th Annual Earth Hour

In a global call for climate action, 350 landmarks in 178 nations across all 24 time zones joined together Saturday night to turn out the lights for Earth Hour, the World Wildlife Fund's annual international demonstration of climate action.

The Houses of Parliament in London go dark for Earth Hour, March 28, 2015. Photo credit: Earth Hour

From the Eiffel Tower to Sydney Opera House to the Empire State Building, concerned citizens around the world showed their dedication to climate action.

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For a deeper dive: AP, Independent, IB Times, Christian Science Monitor, USA Today, Weather Channel, Mashable, Telegraph, News.com.au, Phys.org, CTV, Deutsche Welle, Standard, Inquirer, Straits Times, Times of India, Xinhua, Sun Daily

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