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13 Best Tweets Celebrating Shell Abandoning Arctic Drilling

Climate
13 Best Tweets Celebrating Shell Abandoning Arctic Drilling

After finding little oil and natural gas, Royal Dutch Shell announced yesterday that it would end its Arctic drilling operations in the Chukchi Sea off Alaska’s coast “for the foreseeable future.” Shell said the amount of oil and gas found in the Burger J well is “not sufficient to warrant further exploration.”

Climate groups, such as Greenpeace and Sierra Club, had spent months taking dramatic public actions to call on President Obama to reverse his decision to allow Shell to drill in the Arctic. There were scores of events all around the country. One of the most notable was in July when 13 Climbers suspended themselves from a Portland, Oregon bridge to block a Shell oil vessel from heading to the Arctic. The 40-hour standoff ended with Greenpeace calling on President Obama to "join the millions of people who are speaking with one voice to say it loud and clear: #ShellNo.”

So needless to say, these groups were thrilled when Shell made the announcement. 

Here are the 13 best Tweets from climate activists and organizations celebrating their victory:

1. Reports flooded in that polar bears everywhere hailed Shell's decision:

2. Many people were so happy they just wanted to dance:

3. Actress Emma Thompson was ecstatic:

4. Polar bears even took to dancing:

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5. Patagonia voiced its excitement:

6. All these little ones were thrilled, too:

7. "Today’s news makes it clear our movement is succeeding in defusing the biggest carbon bombs on the planet,” says 350.org:

8. After spending $7 billion on the project, Shell pulled out:

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9. Okay, last polar bear one, I swear:

10. Even kids have been joining in the fight to protect the Arctic:

11. Elon Musk summed it up well the other day in reference to the Volkswagen scandal: Time's up for fossil fuels:

12. These climate groups agree with Hillary Clinton, who came out against Arctic drilling this summer: It's "not worth the risk:"

13. Bottom line: Greenpeace says there's a brighter future ahead:

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