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12 Powerful Images: Who Will Win the Environmental Photographer of the Year?

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12 Powerful Images: Who Will Win the Environmental Photographer of the Year?

If a picture is worth 1,000 words, volumes will be spoken at the Atkins CIWEM (Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management) Environmental Photographer of Year exhibition at London's Royal Geographical Society.

The 111 works in the show were chosen from more than 10,000 entries submitted by both amateur and professional photographers and filmmakers from 6o countries.

"It provides an opportunity for photographers to share images of environmental and social issues with international audiences, and to enhance our understanding of the causes, consequences and solutions to climate change and social inequality," says the organization, which launched the competition in 2007. It says it is "looking in particular for pictures that show the dynamic link between environmental and social issues in a way that makes us think differently about the world around us." Potential topics include climate change, poverty, natural disasters, population growth, human rights, culture, biodiversity, sustainable development and innovation.

Judges will award prizes in several categories Environmental Photographer of the Year, Young Environmental Photographer of the Year (25 and under) and Film of the year. Winners will be announced on  June 25. Past winners have come from Italy, the U.S., Romania and Bangladash, among other countries.

The show opens June 22 and runs through July 10 before beginning a tour of forest venues around the UK.

Here are 12 striking images that should make you want to head to the UK to see the rest of them.

Photo credit: Hoang Long Ly, Fishing net checking, Vietnam 2014

Photo credit: Simon Norfolk, Glacier 1987, Mount Kenya 2014

Photo credit: Kazi Riasat Alve, Collecting crabs, Satkhira 2014

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Photo credit: Jashim Salam, Life in tidal flood 3, Chittagong, Bangladesh 2014

Photo credit: Matthew Cicanese, Cladonia Forest, USA 2014

Photo credit: Luca Catalano Gonzaga, The Devil’s gold, Indonesia 2014

Photo credit:

Rizalde Cayanan, Sandstorm in the city, Kuwait 2011

Photo credit: Eduardo Leal, Plastic tree #20, Bolivia 2014

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Photo credit: Carlos Ayesta and Guillaume Bression, Retrace our steps, Fukushima 2014

Photo credit: Glyn Thomas, The abandoned village of Geamana, Romania 2014

Photo credit: Petrut Calinescu, Beauty Salon, Lagos, Nigeria 2014

Photo credit: Hayri Kodal, Berber 2, Turkey 2011

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