Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

12 Must-See Food Films That Will Inspire You to Take Action

Food

The Real Food Media Project debuted 12 new films to its Real Food Films Library, which now includes more than 60 short films on "food, farming and sustainability, labor, climate, policy solutions and inspiring community food victories from around the world." They are encouraging  people to host a Pop-Up Film Fest over lunch at your office or with neighbors to make the most of the summer backyard season.

The 12 newest additions to Real Food Films Library are sure to inspire. Photo credit: Real Food Media Project

"The films tell the stories—in four minutes or less—of the momentum toward community-based food systems: from farming strategies to keep traditions alive to clever agricultural approaches in the dry Southwest," says Real Food Media. They are completely free and open to the public to use as educational resources for film screenings and community events.

“Our growing film library showcases the best in short films on food, farming and sustainability,” says film library founder, Anna Lappé, “It’s amazing what a punch you can pack in four minutes. I laughed, I cried, I wanted to make pie.”

Here are the 12 newest additions to the Real Food Film Library with descriptions courtesy of Real Food Media:

Blueberry PieNorebo, Finland

The simplicity of from-scratch blueberry pie cooking made like Grandmother Rhea Aminoff used to at Norebo, Kallvik outside Helsinki, Finland.

Bunker Vietnamese: Queens, NY

A Queens, New York restaurant serves up Vietnamese street food, inspired by the chef’s parents.

Camelina: Lamberton, MN

A Minnesotan farm family converts from chemical to organic farming and transforms their land, their family and their business.

Dry Land: Tucson, AZ

A rainwater savant shows how even in the driest desert cities there is untapped potential in rainwater.

Read page 1

From Seed / Land & Freedom: San Diego, CA

An urban garden in San Diego brings together families and communities.

Green Bridge Growers: South Bend, IN

Learn about Green Bridge Growers, a community farm that connects autistic young adults with a sustainable aquaponics business. 

Operation Apple: Grand Isle, OR

A granddaughter and her friends help her grandparents in their annual apple harvest and cider-pressing.

The Dealer: Oakland, CA

A collaboration between filmmaker Jamie DeWolf and The Bigger Picture Project, The Dealer is a poignant, edgy spoken word piece about the effects of sugar on children.

The Future has an Ancient Heart: Irvine, CA

At Alegria’s one-acre farm in southern California, 70,000 plants and 60 different cultivars are flourishing.

The York Region Food Charter: Toronto, Canada

The compelling story of the unique rural-urban character of the region and how they are connecting to build a strong local food system.

Together We Grow: Philadelphia, PA

A seeds-eye look at the University of Pennsylvania’s unique food and farm education project.

Vacant Lot Initiative: Phoenix, AZ

Sustainable farming blossoms in Phoenix, Arizona.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Is Antarctica Ice Melting or Growing? Watch This NASA Video and See for Yourself

California’s Largest Lake Is Drying Up Amid Epic Drought

Group Claims Immigrants Are Causing California Drought

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Moroccan patients who recovered from the novel coronavirus disease celebrate with medical staff as they leave the hospital in Sale, Morocco, on April 3, 2020. AFP / Getty Images

By Tom Duszynski

The coronavirus is certainly scary, but despite the constant reporting on total cases and a climbing death toll, the reality is that the vast majority of people who come down with COVID-19 survive it. Just as the number of cases grows, so does another number: those who have recovered.

In mid-March, the number of patients in the U.S. who had officially recovered from the virus was close to zero. That number is now in the tens of thousands and is climbing every day. But recovering from COVID-19 is more complicated than simply feeling better. Recovery involves biology, epidemiology and a little bit of bureaucracy too.

Read More Show Less
Reef scene with crinoid and fish in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Reinhard Dirscherl / ullstein bild / Getty Images

By Elizabeth Claire Alberts

The future for the world's oceans often looks grim. Fisheries are set to collapse by 2048, according to one study, and 8 million tons of plastic pollute the ocean every year, causing considerable damage to delicate marine ecosystems. Yet a new study in Nature offers an alternative, and more optimistic view on the ocean's future: it asserts that the entire marine environment could be substantially rebuilt by 2050, if humanity is able to step up to the challenge.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A daughter touches her father's head while saying goodbye as medics prepare to transport him to Stamford Hospital on April 02, 2020 in Stamford, Connecticut. He had multiple COVID-19 symptoms. John Moore / Getty Images

Across the country, the novel coronavirus is severely affecting black people at much higher rates than whites, according to data released by several states, as The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Four rolls of sourdough bread are arranged on a surface. Photo by Laura Chase de Formigny and food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post / Getty Images

By Zulfikar Abbany

Bread has been a source of basic nutrition for centuries, the holy trinity being wheat, maize and rice. It has also been the reason for a lot of innovation in science and technology, from millstones to microbiological investigations into a family of single-cell fungi called Saccharomyces.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A coral reef in Egypt's Red Sea. Tropical ocean ecosystems could see sudden biodiversity losses this decade if emissions are not reduced. Georgette Douwma / Stone / Getty Images

The biodiversity loss caused by the climate crisis will be sudden and swift, and could begin before 2030.

Read More Show Less