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12 Most Poisonous Plants for Your Dog and Cat

Health + Wellness

Every year, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals poison control hotline fields about 150,000 calls from frantic pet owners seeking help with accidental pet poisonings. And about a quarter of all pets poisoned by non-drug products are poisoned by plants.

Based on a list of toxic plants from UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicines most common causes of emergency calls and Texas A&M s Common Poisonous Plants and Plant Parts, Matt Zajechowski and Pots, Planters + More compiled a toxic plants guide, breaking down the risks to your cat or dog and warning signs to look out for.

Check it out here:

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