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12 Foods That Can Make You Happy

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12 Foods That Can Make You Happy

By Editors of Prevention

Nutrient-rich whole foods are basically edible Prozac. After a few weeks of eating clean, you may find yourself feeling happier and healthier and having fewer dips in energy. Why? The vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals in fruits, veggies and other whole foods help cells do their job, so your body can operate more efficiently—in fact, a recent study found that people who eat seven or more servings of produce a day are happier and have better mental health.

And eating complex carbohydrates and whole grains—as well as lean proteins and healthy fats—keeps your blood sugar leveled and keeps you satisfied for longer periods of time, so you can avoid getting "hangry" and resist the temptation for a midafternoon cookie or coffee pick-me-up.

The joy you get from eating isn't simply a result of good flavor and mouthfeel—nutrients in certain foods can actually trigger the release of feel-good brain chemicals like dopamine.

Luckily, plenty of clean foods fit the bill. Here are 12 foods blessed with compounds that lift your spirits:

Clams

Walnuts

Flaxseed

Coffee

Radishes

Oysters

Pomegranates

Yogurt

Kefir

Shiitake mushrooms

Chocolate

Apricots


Adapted from Eat Clean. Stay Lean.

This article was reposted with permission from our media associate Rodale Wellness.

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