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11 Edible Flowers to Grow in Your Garden

11 Edible Flowers to Grow in Your Garden

It’s not just fancy chefs that can use flowers to add a little color to a meal; you too can grow your own edible flowers at home. In fact, while you may find edible flowers on sale at a farmers market every now and then, there’s nothing like walking into your garden and picking them fresh.

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Just like with eating anything wild, when it comes to eating flowers, make sure you know what you’re consuming. The easiest way to do that is to plant the flowers yourself.

From nasturtiums to violets, these 11 edible flowers will make a nice complement to any garden—and enjoy a few ideas of how to use them.

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