Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

100 Solutions Wanted for Global Sustainability Campaign

Business

What are the 100 solutions that can make real a sustainable society? Scandinavian think tank, Sustainia, today launches a global campaign to find the answers.

With a worldwide campaign alliance of companies and organizations, the goal is to identify the world’s 100 leading sustainability projects and technologies across sectors such as food, fashion, energy, smart homes etc. Collectively, the solutions form a comprehensive guide to state-of-the-art sustainability practices in industries and regions.

“Sustainia100 raises awareness about the man-made effects on our environment by giving us 100 man-made solutions," says Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri, chair of the United Nations (UN) climate change panel, IPCC, and supporter of the campaign.

"With this solution-based approach, Sustainia100 delivers a clear and comprehensive call for action to a broad audience of politicians and corporations as well as civil society."

Former governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, EU commissioner for Climate Action Connie Hedegaard and UN Global Compact are also part of the campaign to turn spotlight on cutting-edge innovations that can lead the transition to a sustainable society.

From Feb. 3 to March 14, the Sustainia100 is open to submissions for sustainability innovations and projects worldwide. Submitted projects should relate to at least one of ten categories: buildings, food, fashion, transportation, IT, education, energy, health, smart cities and resources. Submissions can be made to Sustainia via: www.sustainia.me.

Intelligent Thermostats, Skyscrapers and Off-grid Solar Lights

Last year, the submitted projects included energy-efficient home thermostats, Chinese skyscrapers with build-in wind turbines and plastic bottles harvesting sunlight in the Philippines. With all innovations being readily available to industries and consumers, the selected solutions collectively form a guide to an achievable sustainable society.

“The Sustainia100 campaign is for the people and by the people. For too many years, we have been waiting for a political breakthrough," says Erik Rasmussen, founder of Sustainia.

"We cannot afford to wait longer. With Sustainia100, we identify the leading available solutions that make it possible to start building a sustainable future today." 

It is the third year the Sustainia100 guide is published. The guide was launched at the Rio+20 summit, June 2012, with 100 solutions representing 45 countries. This year’s selected Sustainia100 solutions will be presented in Oslo, June 14, with innovators and campaign partners present.

Best Project Awarded by Arnold Schwarzenegger

Led by Arnold Schwarzenegger, a jury will select the most groundbreaking solution from the Sustainia100. The winning solution will be honored with Sustainia Award at a ceremony in Copenhagen, Oct. 30. Joining Schwarzenegger in the jury are; former Prime Minister of Norway Gro Harlem Brundtland; Chairman of UN’s climate panel Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri; and EU Commissioner of Climate Action Connie Hedegaard.

“Solutions are transforming our homes, reshaping our cities, and bringing new ideas to entire communities. By sharing what is already working and pushing for new innovations, we will ensure sustainable growth and job growth at the same time," says Schwarzenegger.

Last year’s Sustainia Award winner, Israeli company TaKaDu, presented a new generation of water-grid technology. The software solution locates and classifies leaks and pipe bursts, and alerts utilities immediately. Since the win in Copenhagen, TaKaDu has received broad global attention.

"Being selected as a Sustainia100 solution and winning Sustainia Award opened doors to an audience of global sustainability leaders as well as new business prospects," says founder and CEO Amir Peleg.

"As a young venture, it has been a great opportunity to spread knowledge world-wide of our water-grid technology that saves water here and now."

Visit EcoWatch’s SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Refrigerated trucks function as temporary morgues at the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal on May 06, 2020 in New York City. As of July, the states where COVID-19 cases are rising are mostly in the West and South. Justin Heiman / Getty Images

The official number of people in the U.S. who have lost their lives to the new coronavirus has now passed 130,000, according to tallies from The New York Times, Reuters and Johns Hopkins University.

Read More Show Less
A man walks on pink snow at the Presena glacier near Pellizzano, Italy on July 4, 2020. MIGUEL MEDINA / AFP via Getty Images

In a troubling sign for the future of the Italian Alps, the snow and ice in a glacier is turning pink due to the growth of snow-melting algae, according to scientists studying the pink ice phenomenon, as CNN reported.

Read More Show Less
Climate activist Greta Thunberg discusses EU plans to tackle the climate emergency with Parliament's environment committee on March 4, 2020. CC-BY-4.0: © European Union 2020 – Source: EP

By Abdullahi Alim

The 2008 financial crisis spurred a number of youth movements including Occupy Wall Street and the Arab Spring. A decade later, this anger resurfaced in a new wave of global protests, from Hong Kong to Beirut to London, only this time driven by the children of the 2008 financial crisis.

Read More Show Less
A climate activist holds a victory sign in Washington, DC. after President Obama announced that he would reject the Keystone XL Pipeline proposal on November 6, 2015. Mark Wilson / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

The Supreme Court late Monday upheld a federal judge's rejection of a crucial permit for Keystone XL and blocked the Trump administration's attempt to greenlight construction of the 1,200-mile crude oil project, the third such blow to the fossil fuel industry in a day—coming just hours after the cancellation of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline and the court-ordered shutdown of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Read More Show Less
A forest fire in Yakutsk in eastern Siberia on June 2, 2020. Yevgeny Sofroneyev / TASS via Getty Images

Once thought too frozen to burn, Siberia is now on fire and spewing carbon after enduring its warmest June ever, according to CNN.

Read More Show Less
The Colima fir tree's distribution has been reduced to the area surrounding the Nevado de Colima volcano. Agustín del Castillo

By Agustín del Castillo

For 20 years, the Colima fir tree (Abies colimensis) has been at the heart of many disputes to conserve the temperate forests of southern Jalisco, a state in central Mexico. Today, the future of this tree rests upon whether the area's avocado crops will advance further and whether neighboring communities will unite to protect it.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Independent environmental certifications offer a better indicator of a product's eco credentials, including labor conditions for workers involved in production. Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Jeanette Cwienk

This summer's high street fashions have more in common than styles and colors. From the pink puff-sleeved dream going for just €19.99 ($22.52) at H&M, to Zara's elegant €12.95 ($14.63) halter-neck dress, clothing stores are alive with cheap organic cotton.

"Sustainable" collections with aspirational own-brand names like C&A's "Wear the change," Zara's "join life" or H&M's "CONSCIOUS" are offering cheap fashion and a clean environmental conscience. Such, at least, is the message. But is it really that simple?

Read More Show Less