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100 Solutions Wanted for Global Sustainability Campaign

Business
100 Solutions Wanted for Global Sustainability Campaign

What are the 100 solutions that can make real a sustainable society? Scandinavian think tank, Sustainia, today launches a global campaign to find the answers.

With a worldwide campaign alliance of companies and organizations, the goal is to identify the world’s 100 leading sustainability projects and technologies across sectors such as food, fashion, energy, smart homes etc. Collectively, the solutions form a comprehensive guide to state-of-the-art sustainability practices in industries and regions.

“Sustainia100 raises awareness about the man-made effects on our environment by giving us 100 man-made solutions," says Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri, chair of the United Nations (UN) climate change panel, IPCC, and supporter of the campaign.

"With this solution-based approach, Sustainia100 delivers a clear and comprehensive call for action to a broad audience of politicians and corporations as well as civil society."

Former governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, EU commissioner for Climate Action Connie Hedegaard and UN Global Compact are also part of the campaign to turn spotlight on cutting-edge innovations that can lead the transition to a sustainable society.

From Feb. 3 to March 14, the Sustainia100 is open to submissions for sustainability innovations and projects worldwide. Submitted projects should relate to at least one of ten categories: buildings, food, fashion, transportation, IT, education, energy, health, smart cities and resources. Submissions can be made to Sustainia via: www.sustainia.me.

Intelligent Thermostats, Skyscrapers and Off-grid Solar Lights

Last year, the submitted projects included energy-efficient home thermostats, Chinese skyscrapers with build-in wind turbines and plastic bottles harvesting sunlight in the Philippines. With all innovations being readily available to industries and consumers, the selected solutions collectively form a guide to an achievable sustainable society.

“The Sustainia100 campaign is for the people and by the people. For too many years, we have been waiting for a political breakthrough," says Erik Rasmussen, founder of Sustainia.

"We cannot afford to wait longer. With Sustainia100, we identify the leading available solutions that make it possible to start building a sustainable future today." 

It is the third year the Sustainia100 guide is published. The guide was launched at the Rio+20 summit, June 2012, with 100 solutions representing 45 countries. This year’s selected Sustainia100 solutions will be presented in Oslo, June 14, with innovators and campaign partners present.

Best Project Awarded by Arnold Schwarzenegger

Led by Arnold Schwarzenegger, a jury will select the most groundbreaking solution from the Sustainia100. The winning solution will be honored with Sustainia Award at a ceremony in Copenhagen, Oct. 30. Joining Schwarzenegger in the jury are; former Prime Minister of Norway Gro Harlem Brundtland; Chairman of UN’s climate panel Dr. Rajendra K. Pachauri; and EU Commissioner of Climate Action Connie Hedegaard.

“Solutions are transforming our homes, reshaping our cities, and bringing new ideas to entire communities. By sharing what is already working and pushing for new innovations, we will ensure sustainable growth and job growth at the same time," says Schwarzenegger.

Last year’s Sustainia Award winner, Israeli company TaKaDu, presented a new generation of water-grid technology. The software solution locates and classifies leaks and pipe bursts, and alerts utilities immediately. Since the win in Copenhagen, TaKaDu has received broad global attention.

"Being selected as a Sustainia100 solution and winning Sustainia Award opened doors to an audience of global sustainability leaders as well as new business prospects," says founder and CEO Amir Peleg.

"As a young venture, it has been a great opportunity to spread knowledge world-wide of our water-grid technology that saves water here and now."

Visit EcoWatch’s SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS page for more related news on this topic.

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