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10 Sustainable Business Stories of 2013 Too Important to Miss

Business

By Andrew Winston

Somehow it’s already year-end, a time to look back and try to make sense of what’s happened. Creating any “top” list of stories from 12 months is nearly impossible. But as I’ve done for the last four years, I’ll attempt to summarize some of the latest stories about the big environmental and social pressures on business, and how some innovative companies are dealing with them.

This year, like recent years, saw some continuation of big trends: with a few exceptions, the international policy community keeps failing to come to a meaningful agreement on climate change, carbon emissions just keep rising, transparency is increasingly unavoidable, and keeps gaining technology-enabled traction. Pressure from big companies on their suppliers keeps going up.

So what’s really new this year? Let’s dive in.

Click here to read Harvard Business Review's top 10 sustainable business stories of 2013.

Visit EcoWatch’s SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS page for more related news on this topic.

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