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10 Superfoods You Can Buy This Spring at Your Local Farmers' Markets

Food

If you're like me, you are ecstatic for the bounty of spring at your local farmers' market. You can find many vegetables at your local market that are not only delicious, but packed with essential nutrients. Many of them are even superfoods to keep you healthy and strong. What's available at your local farmer's market obviously depends on where you live, but this list of 10 spring superfoods should be available at farmers' markets in most temperate climates.

You can even find many superfoods at your favorite local farmers' market. Photo credit: Shutterstock

1. Watercress: This peppery flavored aquatic plant has been in cultivation since ancient times for its food and medicinal uses in East-Asia, Central Asia, Europe and the Americas. It is the number one powerhouse superfood according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ranking nutrient density for fruits and vegetables.

2. Arugula: Its aromatic, peppery flavor adds a wonderful dimension to a salad, to your health and maybe even your sex life.

3. Kale: This nutrient-dense food packs a serious punch. It is loaded with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients that build up the immune system and lower cancer risk.

4. Wheatgrass: It contains antioxidants, as well as, anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties, helping to ward off infections, colds, sore throats and other minor infectious diseases.

5. Swiss chard: If you're having trouble sleeping, this dark leafy green could help. In addition to being rich in potassium and magnesium, Swiss chard is high in calcium, which helps the body generate melatonin, the hormone that helps your body maintain its circadian rhythm.

6. Dandelion leaves: The health benefits of dandelion include relief from liver disorders, diabetes, urinary disorders, acne, jaundice, cancer and anemia, according to Organic Facts. It also helps in maintaining bone health, skin care and is a benefit to weight loss programs.

7. Chinese cabbage: This cruciferous vegetable packs even more of a punch than kale (as do several others on this list), according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

8. Spinach: Another super nutrient-dense food, spinach. It is low in calories yet very high in vitamins, minerals and other phytonutrients, according to Naturally Healthy Eating.

9. Collard greens: This dark leafy green is a great source of calcium. One cup contains more than 350 milligrams of calcium, which is about one-third of your recommended daily allowance.

10. Mushrooms: Which mushrooms are in season will depend on your area's particular climate, but if fungi aren't already a part of your diet, they should be. They are packed with vitamin D and immune-boosting antioxidants.

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