Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

10 Stunning Photos of Rare Northern Lights (And How to Take Your Own)

Science

The northern half of the U.S. is in for a rare treat this week. The Northern Lights will be visible across much of the upper parts of the country, according to Accuweather.

Typically, in North America, you have to be in Canada or Alaska to catch a glimpse of this spectacular planetary light show. But due to a "huge solar storm," stargazers from New Hampshire to Nebraska might see the show tonight. Unfortunately, the skies in the Pacific Northwest and Canada will probably be too cloudy to have a good view, says Accuweather.

Here are the keys to catching a glimpse (and a photo) of the Aurora borealis, according to Accuweather:

  • If you're in an area where the clouds are not obstructing your view of the night sky, you may still have to do more than stepping into your back yard to see the aurora.

  • Being in a dark area with a clear view of the northern horizon is key to seeing the aurora. If you are trying to catch a glimpse of the aurora, you should travel to a spot that is far away from the light pollution given off by cities and towns.

  • Being in a dark area is also important if you are trying to capture a picture of the northern lights. For the best results, you should use a camera that allows to you take pictures with an exposure of 10 to 30 seconds.

And if you're wondering what the heck you're looking at, the Northern Lights are caused by "collisions between electrically charged particles from the sun that enter the earth's atmosphere," explains the Northern Lights Centre in Canada. "The lights are seen above the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres. They are known as 'Aurora borealis' in the north and 'Aurora australis' in the south."

Read page 1

And even if you don't end up seeing the Northern Lights, you might catch the Taurids meteor shower. The meteor shower "will last into the middle of November, producing roughly five to 10 meteors per hour," says Accuweather. The Taurids are known for the brightness—sometimes shining even brighter than Venus, the third brightest object in the sky.

"The gradual peak of the shower is now through Nov. 12, with a possible absolute peak on the night of Nov. 11," reports AccuWeather Meteorologist Dave Samuhel.

And if you can't see anything, you can always watch super cool YouTube videos of the sun like you've never seen it before, this breathtaking time lapse video of the night sky or this amazing video of Yellowstone by moonlight.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Breathtaking NASA Video Shows the Sun Like You’ve Never Seen It Before

Elon Musk’s Brother Wants to Revolutionize Our Food System

Millions of Dog-Coyote-Wolf Hybrids Now Roam Eastern U.S.

CBS Reporter Ben Swann Tells the Truth About CDC Vaccine Cover-Up

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Moroccan patients who recovered from the novel coronavirus disease celebrate with medical staff as they leave the hospital in Sale, Morocco, on April 3, 2020. AFP / Getty Images

By Tom Duszynski

The coronavirus is certainly scary, but despite the constant reporting on total cases and a climbing death toll, the reality is that the vast majority of people who come down with COVID-19 survive it. Just as the number of cases grows, so does another number: those who have recovered.

In mid-March, the number of patients in the U.S. who had officially recovered from the virus was close to zero. That number is now in the tens of thousands and is climbing every day. But recovering from COVID-19 is more complicated than simply feeling better. Recovery involves biology, epidemiology and a little bit of bureaucracy too.

Read More Show Less
Reef scene with crinoid and fish in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Reinhard Dirscherl / ullstein bild / Getty Images

By Elizabeth Claire Alberts

The future for the world's oceans often looks grim. Fisheries are set to collapse by 2048, according to one study, and 8 million tons of plastic pollute the ocean every year, causing considerable damage to delicate marine ecosystems. Yet a new study in Nature offers an alternative, and more optimistic view on the ocean's future: it asserts that the entire marine environment could be substantially rebuilt by 2050, if humanity is able to step up to the challenge.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A daughter touches her father's head while saying goodbye as medics prepare to transport him to Stamford Hospital on April 02, 2020 in Stamford, Connecticut. He had multiple COVID-19 symptoms. John Moore / Getty Images

Across the country, the novel coronavirus is severely affecting black people at much higher rates than whites, according to data released by several states, as The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Four rolls of sourdough bread are arranged on a surface. Photo by Laura Chase de Formigny and food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post / Getty Images

By Zulfikar Abbany

Bread has been a source of basic nutrition for centuries, the holy trinity being wheat, maize and rice. It has also been the reason for a lot of innovation in science and technology, from millstones to microbiological investigations into a family of single-cell fungi called Saccharomyces.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A coral reef in Egypt's Red Sea. Tropical ocean ecosystems could see sudden biodiversity losses this decade if emissions are not reduced. Georgette Douwma / Stone / Getty Images

The biodiversity loss caused by the climate crisis will be sudden and swift, and could begin before 2030.

Read More Show Less