Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

10 Stunning Photos of Rare Northern Lights (And How to Take Your Own)

Science
10 Stunning Photos of Rare Northern Lights (And How to Take Your Own)

The northern half of the U.S. is in for a rare treat this week. The Northern Lights will be visible across much of the upper parts of the country, according to Accuweather.

Typically, in North America, you have to be in Canada or Alaska to catch a glimpse of this spectacular planetary light show. But due to a "huge solar storm," stargazers from New Hampshire to Nebraska might see the show tonight. Unfortunately, the skies in the Pacific Northwest and Canada will probably be too cloudy to have a good view, says Accuweather.

Here are the keys to catching a glimpse (and a photo) of the Aurora borealis, according to Accuweather:

  • If you're in an area where the clouds are not obstructing your view of the night sky, you may still have to do more than stepping into your back yard to see the aurora.

  • Being in a dark area with a clear view of the northern horizon is key to seeing the aurora. If you are trying to catch a glimpse of the aurora, you should travel to a spot that is far away from the light pollution given off by cities and towns.

  • Being in a dark area is also important if you are trying to capture a picture of the northern lights. For the best results, you should use a camera that allows to you take pictures with an exposure of 10 to 30 seconds.

And if you're wondering what the heck you're looking at, the Northern Lights are caused by "collisions between electrically charged particles from the sun that enter the earth's atmosphere," explains the Northern Lights Centre in Canada. "The lights are seen above the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres. They are known as 'Aurora borealis' in the north and 'Aurora australis' in the south."

Read page 1

And even if you don't end up seeing the Northern Lights, you might catch the Taurids meteor shower. The meteor shower "will last into the middle of November, producing roughly five to 10 meteors per hour," says Accuweather. The Taurids are known for the brightness—sometimes shining even brighter than Venus, the third brightest object in the sky.

"The gradual peak of the shower is now through Nov. 12, with a possible absolute peak on the night of Nov. 11," reports AccuWeather Meteorologist Dave Samuhel.

And if you can't see anything, you can always watch super cool YouTube videos of the sun like you've never seen it before, this breathtaking time lapse video of the night sky or this amazing video of Yellowstone by moonlight.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Breathtaking NASA Video Shows the Sun Like You’ve Never Seen It Before

Elon Musk’s Brother Wants to Revolutionize Our Food System

Millions of Dog-Coyote-Wolf Hybrids Now Roam Eastern U.S.

CBS Reporter Ben Swann Tells the Truth About CDC Vaccine Cover-Up

Rise and Resist activist group marched together to demand climate and racial justice. Steve Sanchez / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Alexandria Villaseñor

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

My journey to becoming an activist began in late 2018. During a trip to California to visit family, the Camp Fire broke out. At the time, it was the most devastating and destructive wildfire in California history. Thousands of acres and structures burned, and many lives were lost. Since then, California's wildfires have accelerated: This past year, we saw the first-ever "gigafire," and by the end of 2020, more than four million acres had burned.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland announced a pair of climate-related secretarial orders on Friday, April 16. U.S. Department of the Interior

By Jessica Corbett

As the Biden administration reviews the U.S. government's federal fossil fuels program and faces pressure to block any new dirty energy development, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland won praise from environmentalists on Friday for issuing a pair of climate-related secretarial orders.

Read More Show Less
Trending
David Attenborough narrates "The Year Earth Changed," premiering globally April 16 on Apple TV+. Apple

Next week marks the second Earth Day of the coronavirus pandemic. While a year of lockdowns and travel restrictions has limited our ability to explore the natural world and gather with others for its defense, it is still possible to experience the wonder and inspiration from the safety of your home.

Read More Show Less

By Michael Svoboda

For April's bookshelf we take a cue from Earth Day and step back to look at the bigger picture. It wasn't climate change that motivated people to attend the teach-ins and protests that marked that first observance in 1970; it was pollution, the destruction of wild lands and habitats, and the consequent deaths of species.

Read More Show Less
An Amazon.com Inc. worker walks past a row of vans outside a distribution facility on Feb. 2, 2021 in Hawthorne, California. PATRICK T. FALLON / AFP via Getty Images

Over the past year, Amazon has significantly expanded its warehouses in Southern California, employing residents in communities that have suffered from high unemployment rates, The Guardian reports. But a new report shows the negative environmental impacts of the boom, highlighting its impact on low-income communities of color across Southern California.

Read More Show Less