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10 Must-See Photos From National Geographic's Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

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10 Must-See Photos From National Geographic's Travel Photographer of the Year Contest

The entry deadline has passed and it's time for the judging to begin. Who will be the 2016 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year?

Submitted photos are placed in one of three categories: people, cities and nature. Each category will name its top three winners. The first place prize is a Sony a6300 camera; second place prize is The Art of Travel Photography on DVD; and the third place prize is the book Destinations of a Lifetime.

An overall winner will also be selected. The grand prize for this year's contest includes a 7-day polar bear safari trip for two to Churchill Wild-Seal River Heritage Lodge and the title of 2016 National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year. Each winner will also receive a subscription to National Geographic Traveler magazine, according to the contest's website.

Winners will be announced early July. Below are some entries that sparked EcoWatch's interest. Visit the contest's website to see all the entries.

1. Eternity by Johns Tsai

Photo credit: Johns Tsai on Nov. 10, 2014 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

2. Preparing for tourism in Arctic Ocean by Esther Horvath

Photo credit: Esther Horvath on July 15, 2015 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

3. Seeking Within by Raul Espinoza

Photo credit: Raul Espinoza on Jan. 20, 2012 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

4. Incense Maker by Art Chen

Photo credit: Art Chen on Sept. 18, 2015 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

5. Fishermen at sunset by mirjameversphoto@gmail.com Evers

Photo credit: mirjameversphoto@gmail.com Evers on Oct. 30, 2014 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

6. Cellular by JP Miles

Photo credit: JP Miles on March 28, 2016 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

7. Cape Naturalist by Peter Evans

Photo credit: Peter Evans on June 4, 2014 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

8. Save water, save fuel by Neelesh EK

Photo credit: Neelesh EK on April 8, 2015 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

9. Texas Cowboys by Zhuo Zhang

Photo credit: Zhuo Zhang on Feb. 4, 2014 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

10. Synchronized swimming by Jamin Martinelli

Photo credit: Jamin Martinelli on Oct. 7, 2015 / National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year contest

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