Quantcast

10 Awesome Tweets From #ShellNo to Arctic Drilling Day of Action

Energy

Kayaktivism spread across the country yesterday as people in 13 states gathered for a Shell No” Day of Action asking President Obama to revoke oil and gas exploration leases in the Chukchi Sea. In Washington DC, activists brought their message right to President Obama’s doorstep by staging an Arctic marine scene in Lafayette Park to protest Shell and other companies drilling in the Arctic Ocean.

Read page 1

 

Read page 1

According to Friends of the Earth:

Shell Oil only requires one more drilling permit to begin drilling in the Chukchi Sea in less than a month. President Obama’s own advisers have warned that leases in the Chukchi Sea carry a 75 percent risk of a major oil spill. Climate science dictates that Arctic Ocean oil and gas must remain in the ground in order to avert the worst consequences of climate disruption.

Many organizations were involved in yesterday's day of action, including 350.org, Alaska Wilderness League, Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace, Natural Resources Defense Council and Sierra Club.

"We are unified in our opposition to Shell’s plans to destroy the Arctic," says the coalition website OurArcticOcean.org. "The Arctic Ocean is one of the most unique marine ecosystems in the world. Many of America’s most iconic creatures thrive here including walrus, polar bears, whales, seals and countless birds. Arctic oil is also 100 percent unburnable carbon and must stay in the ground to stay in line with what science tells us is necessary for a safe climate future. Shell’s drilling rigs might be heading to the Arctic, but there is still time to stop this madness. We must keep the momentum going and tell President Obama’s to put an end to Arctic drilling."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Al Gore: Obama’s Plan for Arctic Drilling Is ‘Insane’

Stop Shell. Save the Arctic.

One Woman’s 2,000 Mile Paddle From the Big Apple to the Big Easy

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pixabay

By Lisa Wartenberg, MFA, RD, LD

Pears are sweet, bell-shaped fruits that have been enjoyed since ancient times. They can be eaten crisp or soft.

Read More Show Less
Photon-Photos / iStock / Getty Images Plus

The desert of Australia's Northern Territory has the iconic Ayers Rock, but not much else. Soon, it may be known as home to the world's largest solar farm, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
A Boeing 737-800 BCF (Boeing Converted Freighter) is marked "Prime Air" as part of Amazon Prime's freight aircraft during the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France on June 22. Mustafa Yalcin / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

It's Prime Day! The day when thousands of increasingly absurd items are discounted so deeply that you suddenly need items you never knew existed. Yes, I do need a hotdog shaped toaster next to me while I watch this Fast & Furious seven movie box set! And I need it in my house today!

Read More Show Less

By Peter Sinclair

The weather in many areas across the U.S. has been – and certainly throughout America's heartland was for much of the past winter and spring – frightful.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
There's a short window between when a tick bites and when it passes on bacteria or virus. MSU Ag Communications, Courtesy Dr. Tina Nations, CC BY-ND

By Jerome Goddard

When it comes to problems caused by ticks, Lyme disease hogs a lot of the limelight. But various tick species carry and transmit a collection of other pathogens, some of which cause serious, even fatal, conditions.

Read More Show Less
tomosang / Moment / Getty Images

By Jessica A. Knoblauch

Say goodbye to one of the dreamiest things about childhood. In the Midwest, fireflies are dying off.

Read More Show Less
A new Climate Emergency Fund contains more than $625,000 which will go to grassroots climate action groups like Extinction Rebellion and students who have organized weekly climate strikes all over the world. @ExtinctionR / Twitter

By Julia Conley

Heeding the call of grassroots campaigners, several wealthy philanthropists announced Friday a new fund that will raise money for climate action groups around the world.

Read More Show Less