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10 Awesome Tweets From #ShellNo to Arctic Drilling Day of Action

Energy

Kayaktivism spread across the country yesterday as people in 13 states gathered for a Shell No” Day of Action asking President Obama to revoke oil and gas exploration leases in the Chukchi Sea. In Washington DC, activists brought their message right to President Obama’s doorstep by staging an Arctic marine scene in Lafayette Park to protest Shell and other companies drilling in the Arctic Ocean.

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According to Friends of the Earth:

Shell Oil only requires one more drilling permit to begin drilling in the Chukchi Sea in less than a month. President Obama’s own advisers have warned that leases in the Chukchi Sea carry a 75 percent risk of a major oil spill. Climate science dictates that Arctic Ocean oil and gas must remain in the ground in order to avert the worst consequences of climate disruption.

Many organizations were involved in yesterday's day of action, including 350.org, Alaska Wilderness League, Friends of the Earth, Greenpeace, Natural Resources Defense Council and Sierra Club.

"We are unified in our opposition to Shell’s plans to destroy the Arctic," says the coalition website OurArcticOcean.org. "The Arctic Ocean is one of the most unique marine ecosystems in the world. Many of America’s most iconic creatures thrive here including walrus, polar bears, whales, seals and countless birds. Arctic oil is also 100 percent unburnable carbon and must stay in the ground to stay in line with what science tells us is necessary for a safe climate future. Shell’s drilling rigs might be heading to the Arctic, but there is still time to stop this madness. We must keep the momentum going and tell President Obama’s to put an end to Arctic drilling."

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